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Criminology and Criminal Justice — Overview

Forthcoming Subject Events


November 2014

Centre for Criminology
Wrongful conviction and the death penalty: the inevitability of error?
Mathematical Institute L4 at 11:30
Centre for Criminology Informal Seminar series - Knowledge exchange and impact
Gaining and Maintaining Access, views from the academy and the prison
Speaker: Prof Mary Bosworth & Jamie Bennett, HMP Grendon and Spring Hill
Centre for Criminology Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00
Centre for Criminology Informal Seminar series - Knowledge exchange and impact
The promise and pitfalls of a statistical approach
Speaker: Dr Ben Bradford
Centre for Criminology Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00
Centre for Criminology Informal Seminar series - Knowledge exchange and impact
Of other Knowledge: Frictions in knowing atrocity and its (ethical) implication for exchange and dissemination
Speaker: Dr Julia Viebach
Centre for Criminology Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00

January 2015

Informal Seminar Series - Knowledge exchange and impact
Conducting research with women
Speaker: Prof Mary Bosworth & Charlotte Pattison Rideout, Bronzefield Prison for Women, Sodexho
Centre for Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00

February 2015

Informal Seminar Series - Knowledge exchange and impact
Victim Inclusion in the 21st Century
Speaker: Alan Cusak
Centre for Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00
Informal Seminar Series - Knowledge exchange and impact
Dealing with Difference: Immigration Detention
Speaker: Prof Mary Bosworth &Paul Morrison, , Mitie
Centre for Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00

March 2015

Informal Seminar Series - Knowledge exchange and impact
Cloaking rehabilitation as retribution
Speaker: Netanel Dagan
Centre for Criminology Meeting Room at 15:00

Discussion Groups

These self-sustaining groups are an essential part of the life of our graduate school. They are organised in some cases by graduate students and in others by Faculty members and meet regularly during term, typically over a sandwich lunch, when one of the group presents work in progress or introduces a discussion of a particular issue or new case. They may also encompass guest speakers from the faculty and beyond.

Police and Policing Research Discussion Group

Publications

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Showing all 82 Criminology and Criminal Justice publications currently held in our database
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Journal Articles

2014

M Bosworth and G Slade, 'In Search of Recognition: Gender and Staff-Detainee Relations in a British Immigration Removal Centre' (2014) 16 Punishment & Society (forthcoming)

C Hoyle and Leila Ullrich, 'New Court, New Justice? The Evolution of Justice for Victims at Domestic Courts and the International Criminal Court' (2014) Journal of International Criminal Justice [...]

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first international criminal justice institution that explicitly promises to deliver justice for victims by providing for the rights of victims to participation and reparation in criminal proceedings. More than a decade after its establishment, the time is right to consider how this new idea of justice for victims has developed at the ICC. While analysis of the ICC’s framework has benefited from international law and other academic disciplines, such as international relations and politics, there has been too little attention paid to international criminal justice by mainstream criminologists and victimologists. To fill this gap, this article will systematically reflect on the similarities and differences in the evolution of the idea of justice for victims at domestic criminal courts and the ICC from a criminological and victimological perspective. Overall, the comparison suggests that while the concept of justice for victims has been mainly understood in terms of the benefits and problems of incorporating victims’ rights into criminal law procedure in the domestic context, at the ICC, it has led to broader contestations and redefinitions of the very meaning of justice. These contestations on justice have to be understood in the institutional context of a still young and sui generis court that is unsure of the kind of justice it can and should deliver.


C Hoyle, 'The Role of the Victim in Criminal Justice in England' [2014] 37 Criminal Law Review 490

2012

A Ashworth, 'Departures from the Sentencing Guidelines' [2012] Criminal Law Review [...]

A critique of the law and practice relating to departues from the sentencing guidelines in England and Wales


ISBN: 0011-135X

L Zedner, 'Risiko, Sicherheit und Terrorismus: Drei Konzepte auf der Suche nach einer akademishen Disziplin' (2012) 10 Kriminiologisches Journal 30

2010

A Ashworth, 'Sentencing Guidelines and the Sentencing Council' [2010] Criminal Law Review 389 [...]

A critical assessment of the provisions of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 relating to sentencing guidelines and the new Sentencing Council.


2007

G.Robinson and R Burnett, 'Experiencing modernisation: frontline probation perspectives on the transition to a national offender management service' (2007) 54 Probation Journal 318

L Zedner and I Loader, 'Police beyond Law' (2007) vol.10, no.1 New Criminal Law Review 142 [...]

Critical review essay of Markus Dubber The Police Power: Patriarchy and the Foundations of American Government.


ISBN: 1933-4192

2006

M Bosworth, 'Self-harm in women's prisons' (2006) 5 Criminology and Public Policy 157 [...]

Abstract: This is a brief overview of the literature and issues associated with self-harm in women's prisons. It served as an introduction to a longer paper by someone else and a response both of which I commissioned and edited for the journal. The journal is one of the official publications of the American Society of Criminology.

R Burnett and S Maruna, 'The kindness of prisoners: strengths-based resettlement in theory and in action' (2006) 6 Criminology and Criminal Justice 83

B Goold, 'Open to All? Regulating Open Street CCTV and the Case for 'Symmetrical Surveillance'' (2006) (Winter/Spring 2006) Criminal Justice Ethics 25(1) 3

L Zedner, 'Liquid Security: Managing the market for crime control' (2006) 6 (2) Criminology and Criminal Justice 267 [...]

This article examines attempts to regulate the growing private security market drawing on the literatures of economic analysis of law and regulation.


ISBN: 1748-8958

L Zedner, 'Neither safe nor sound? The perils and possibilities of risk' (2006) 48/3 Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice 423 [...]

Examines the implications of risk reduction as a basis for penal policy and explores how adjacent social scientific disciplines conceive, deploy, and respond to risk.


ISBN: 1707-7753

2005

A Ashworth and Elaine Player, 'Criminal Justice Act 2003: the Sentencing Principles' (2005) 68 Modern Law Review 822 [...]

A critical review of the major sentencing provisions introduced by the Criminal Justice Act 2003.


ISBN: 0026-7961

2004

A Ashworth, 'Criminal Justice Reform: Principles, Human Rights and Public Protection' [2004] Criminal Law Review 516 [...]

Critique of foundations for recent criminal justice legislation


ISBN: 0011-135X

M Bosworth, 'Theorizing Race and Imprisonment: Towards a New Penality' (2004) 12 Critical Criminology 221 [...]

Abstract: This is a comparison of historical and contemporary issues to do with race and prisons in the UK, France and the USA.

B Goold, 'Idealizing the Other? Orientalism and the Study of Japanese Criminal Justice' (2004) 23(1) (Winter/Spring 2004) Criminal Justice Ethics

2003

B Goold, 'Public Area Surveillance and Policing: The Impact of CCTV on Police Behaviour and Autonomy' (2003) 2(1) January 2003 Journal of Surveillance and Society .

B Goold, 'Restorative Cautioning, Theories of Reintegration, and the Influence of Japanese Notions of Shame' (2003) 36(2) December 2003 Hosei Riron (The Journal of Law and Politics, Japan)

C Hoyle, Roderick Hill, Karen Cooper and Richard Young, 'Introducing Restorative Justice to the Police Complaints System: Close Encounters of the Rare Kind.' (2003) Occasional Paper No. 20. Centre for Criminological Research 35 [...]

Abstract: This report presents a discussion of data on the introduction of restorative processes in the police complaints system.

ISBN: 0 947811 19 2

2002

B Goold, 'CCTV and Public Area Surveillance in Japan: Balancing Privacy Rights and Police Powers' (2002) 34(6) December 2002 Hosei Riron (The Journal of Law and Politics, Japan)

B Goold, 'Privacy Rights and Public Spaces: CCTV and the Problem of the ‘Unobservable Observer' (2002) 21(1) Winter/Spring 2002 Criminal Justice Ethics

2001

C Hoyle, 'Restorative Justice in the Thames Valley: Changes in the Complaints and Discipline Process,' (2001) 133 Prison Service Journal 37 [...]

Abstract: A description of the recent move towards using restorative justice for the complaints and discipline process in the Thames Valley.

ISBN: 0300-3558

C Hoyle, Andrew Sanders, Rod Morgan and Ed Cape, 'Victim Impact Statements: Don't work, Can't work' [2001] June Criminal Law Review 437 [...]

Abstract: This article contributes to the debate in the Criminal Law Review between Erez and Ashworth on victim impact statement schemes (VIS). The authors argue that VIS are misconceived in principle and unsatisfactory in practice.

ISBN: 0011 135X

Books

2014

M Bosworth, Inside Immigration Detention: Foreigners in a Carceral Age (Oxford University Press 2014) (forthcoming)

Roger Hood and C Hoyle, The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective (5th edn, Oxford University Press 2014)

Andrew Ashworth and L Zedner, Preventive Justice ( 2014)

2011

D. Faulkner and R Burnett, Where Next for Criminal Justice? (The Policy Press 2011)

2010

A Ashworth, Sentencing and Criminal Justice (5th edn, Cambridge University Press 2010)

A Ashworth and Mike Redmayne, The Criminal Process (Oxford University Press 2010)

2008

A Ashworth and L H Zedner, Defending the Criminal Law: Reflections on the Changing Character of Crime, Procedure and Sanctions (2, Criminal Law and Philosophy 2008) [...]

DOI: 10.1007/s11572-007-9033-2

Re-assessment of the trend away from traditional criminal law and criminal procedure, and re-assertion of the normative significance of criminal law principles and protections.


ISBN: 1871-9791

2005

A Ashworth and Andrew von Hirsch, Proportionate Sentencing: Exploring the Principles (Oxford University Press 2005) [...]

An exploration and refinement of the application of the proportionality principle in the theory of punishment and sentencing.


ISBN: 0-19-927260-3

A Ashworth and others, The Criminal Process (Oxford University Press 2005) [...]

The third (expanded) edition of a critical text on the English criminal process and criminal procedure.


ISBN: 0-19-927338-3

2004

B Goold, CCTV and Policing: Public Area Surveillance and Police Practices in Britain (Clarendon Series in Criminology, Oxford University Press 2004)

2002

M Bosworth, The US Federal Prison System (Sage Publications 2002) [...]

Abstract: This book pulls together scholarly research, government publications and first hand accounts to provide the first overview of policy and practice in the US Federal Prison system. It also contains an appendix listing and describing all federal prisons. It is a cross-over book, designed for prison researchers, prisoners and those who work with them. It was positively reviewed in academic journals.

ISBN: 0-7619-2304-7

1992

J Morgan and L Zedner, Child Victims, Crime, Impact, and Criminal Justice (Oxford University Press 1992)

1991

L Zedner, Women, Crime, and Custody in Victorian England (Oxford University Press 1991)

Chapters

2015

M Bosworth and Turnbull, Sarah, 'Immigration Detention and the Expansion of Penal Power in the UK' in K. Reiter and A. Koenig. (eds), Extreme Punishment (Palgrave 2015)

M Bosworth, 'Immigration Detention, Ambivalence and the Colonial Other ' in Eriksson, Anna (eds), Punishing the Other (Routledge 2015)

M Bosworth, I Hasselberg and S Turnbull, 'Imprisonment in a Global Age: Rethinking Penal Power' in Y Jewkes, B Crewe and J Bennett (eds), Handbook of Prisons (Sage Publications 2015)

2014

M Bosworth, 'Immigration Detention' in S Pickering (ed), Routledge Handbook on Crime and Migration ( 2014) (forthcoming)

S Pickering, M Bosworth and KF Aas, 'The Criminology of Mobility' in S Pickering (ed), Routledge Handbook on Crime and Migration (Routledge 2014) (forthcoming)

2013

A Ashworth, 'The Struggle for Supremacy in Sentencing' in A. Ashworth and J.V. Roberts (eds), Sentencing Guidelines: Exploring the English Model (Oxford University Press 2013) [...]

An analysis of the politics of sentencing in the first decade of this century, assessing the positions of the judiciary, the government and the sentencing guideline bodies and their respective influences on sentencing policy.


ISBN: 978-0-19-968457-1

M Bosworth, 'Can Immigration Detention be Legitimate' in KF Aas and M Bosworth (eds), The Borders of Punishment: Citizenship, Crime Control and Social Exclusion (Oxford University Press 2013) (forthcoming)

KF Aas and M Bosworth, 'Preface' in KF Aas and M Bosworth (eds), The Borders of Punishment: Citizenship, Crime Control and Social Exclusion (Oxford University Press 2013) (forthcoming)

2012

L Zedner, 'Erring on the side of safety: Risk assessment, expert knowledge, and the criminal court' in I Dennis & GR Sullivan (eds), Seeking Security: Pre-empting the Commission of Criminal Harms (Hart Publishing 2012)

2011

A Ashworth, 'Criminal Justice, not Criminology?' in Mary Bosworth and Carolyn Hoyle (eds), What is Criminology? (Oxford University Press 2011) [...]

An attempt to discuss the distinctions and interrelations between criminology, criminal justice and criminal law.


ISBN: 978-0-19-957182-6

2008

C Hoyle, 'Restorative Justice, Victims and the Police' in T Newburn (ed), Handbook of Policing, 2nd edn. (Willan Publishing 2008) [...]

Abstract: This chapter explores the ways in which the police in the UK use the principles of restorative justice in their encounters with victims and offenders, adult and juvenile. It argues that there are practical and philosophical objections to the police involvement in restorative justice, and that these, at lesat in part, explain wy there seems to be less restorative activity in the UK in 2008 that there was at teh start of the twenty-first century

ISBN: 978-1-84392-323-7

2007

A Ashworth, 'Plea-Bargaining, Pragmatism and Rights' in H. Muller-Dietz, E. Muller, K.-L. Kunz, H. Radtke, G. Britz, C. Momsen, H. Koriath (eds), Festschrift fur Heike Jung (Nomos 2007) [...]

Exploring the compatibility of plea bargaining with the presumption of innocence.


ISBN: 978-3-8329-2537-6

M Bosworth, 'Identity, Citizenship and Punishment' in Mary Bosworth and Jeanne Flavin (eds), Race, gender and punishment: From colonialism to the war on terror (Rutgers University Press 2007) [...]

Abstract: Chapter in book I coedited on race, gender and punishment. Analysis of recent legislation in the USA.

ISBN: 0-8135-3904-8

R Burnett, Baker, K. and Roberts, C., 'Assessment, supervision and intervention: fundamental practice in probation' in L. Gelsthorpe and R. Morgan (eds.) (eds), Handbook of Probation (Willan 2007)

L Zedner and Carolyn Hoyle, 'Victims, Victimization, and the Criminal Process' in M Maguire, R Morgan & R Reiner (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Criminology (Oxford University Press 2007) [...]

Authoritative overview of the literature and research on victims and their role in the criminal process for the key criminological textbook in the field.


ISBN: 978-0-19-920543-1

2006

L Zedner, 'Opportunity makes the Thief-Taker: the influence of economic analysis on crime control' in T Newburn and P Rock (eds), The Politics of Crime Control (Oxford University Press 2006) [...]

An appraisal of the impact of economic analysis/rational choice theory on criminal justice politics and Home Office policy making.


ISBN: 0-19-920840-9

L Zedner, 'Punishment and the Plurality of Privacy Interests' in E Claes and A Duff (eds), Privacy and the Criminal Law ( 2006) [...]

Questions the status of privacy as a right and attempts to articulate the range of interests that arise when reference is made to privacy.


ISBN: 90-5095-545-2

2005

R Burnett, 'Youth offending teams' in T. Bateman and J. Pitts (eds), Companion to Youth Justice (Russell House Publishing 2005)

B Goold, 'Entries for Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Yugoslavia' in L.E. Sullivan and M.R. Haberfeld (eds), Encyclopedia Of Law Enforcement (Sage Publishing 2005) [...]

Profiles on the criminal justice systems of Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Yugoslavia for the Encyclopedia Of Law Enforcement


ISBN: 0-7619-2649-6

B Goold, 'Unter dem Auge der Kamera. CCTV und Polizeiarbeit' in Leon Hempel and Jörg Metelmann (eds), Bild - Raum - KontrolleVideoüberwachung als Zeichen gesellschaftlichen Wandels (Suhrkamp Verlag Germany 2005) [...]

Image - space - control. Video control as a sign of societal change. Book chapter on the impact of CCTV on police practices in Britain, with particular reference to the implications of recent findings on the use of police surveillance technologies in Germany and Europe more generally.


ISBN: 3-518-29338-9

2003

R Young and C Hoyle, 'New Improved Restorative Justice?: Action-Research and the Thames Valley Initiative in Restorative Cautioning' in A von Hirsch, A Bottoms, J Roberts, K Roach and M Schiff (eds), Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice: Competing or Complementary Paradigms? (Hart Publishing 2003) [...]

Abstract: Empirical research by the authors is used to illuminate the developing practice of police-led restorative justice in the UK.

ISBN: 1-84113-273-X

C Hoyle and Richard Young, 'Restorative Justice and Punishment' in S. McConville (ed), The Use of Punishment (Willan Publishing 2003) [...]

Abstract: This chapter considers the development of restorative justice, its applications, its relationship with state justice, its relationship with vengeance and punishment, and some interconnected philosophical issues.

ISBN: 1-84392-033-6

C Hoyle and Richard Young, 'Restorative Justice, Victims and the Police' in T Newburn (ed), Handbook of Policing (Willan Publishing. 2003) [...]

Abstract: This chapter explores the various ways in which the police are experimenting with the principles of restorative justice in the United Kingdom and draws on empirical research conducted by the authors.

ISBN: 1-84392-020-4

2002

C Hoyle and Richard Young, 'Restorative Justice: Assessing the Prospects and Pitfalls' in M McConville and G Wilson (eds), The Handbook of the Criminal Justice Process (Oxford University Press 2002) [...]

Abstract: An assessment of the prospects and pitfalls of restorative justice.

ISBN: 0-19-925395-1

Edited books

2015

J Roberts (ed), Exploring Sentencing. Empirical and Normative Aspects of Legal Punishment in England and Wales. (Palgrave 2015) (forthcoming)

2013

A Ashworth and J. V. Roberts (eds), Sentencing Guidelines: Exploring the English Model (Oxford University Press 2013) [...]

An edited book of essays on the English sentencing guidelines, reflecting critically on their merits both intrinsically and as compared with guidelines in other jurisdictions.


ISBN: 978-0-19-968457-1

2007

M Bosworth and Jeanne Flavin (eds), Race, gender and punishment: From colonialism to the war on terror (Rutgers University Press 2007) [...]

Abstract: I contribute a chapter, plus a co-written introduction and conclusion. This is a collection of original essays on the history, theory and contemporary format of race, gender and punishment in the US.

ISBN: 0-8135-3904-8

2006

L Zedner and B Goold (eds), Crime and Security (Ashgate 2006) [...]

Edited volume of leading articles in the field selected and introduced by us.


ISBN: 0 7546 2600 8

2005

M Bosworth (ed), Encyclopedia of Prisons and Correctional Facilties, Volume One and Two. (Sage Reference 2005) [...]

Abstract: This two volume work was awarded Best Reference 2005 by the Library Journal. I contribute some entries, as well as an introduction.

2002

C Hoyle and Richard Young (eds), New Visions of Crime Victims (Hart Publishing 2002) [...]

Abstract: An innovative edited collection of original theoretical analyses and previously unpublished empirical research on criminal victimisation. I edited this with Richard Young, wrote a chapter and a preface.

ISBN: 1-84113-280-2

Internet Publications
Others
Reports

2012

M Bosworth and B Kellezi, 'Quality of Life in Detention: Results from the MQLD Questionnaire Data Collected in IRC Yarl’s Wood, IRC Tinsley House and IRC Brook House, August 2010 – June 2011.' (Centre for Criminology 2012)

2004

C Hoyle, A Wilcox and R Young, 'Two-year Resanctioning Study: A Comparison of Restorative and Traditional Cautions' (Home Office 57 1 2004) [...]

Abstract: This study reports the results of a 24 month resanctioning study of traditional and restorative cautions. It compared the resanctioning rates of over 29,000 offenders in the 3 police forces (2 using restorative cautions and 2 using the traditional process). No evidence was found to suggest that restorative cautioning resulted in a statistically significantly reduction in the resanctioning rate or the frequency or seriousness of offending.

ISBN: 1 84473 479X

2003

C Hoyle, Roderick Hill, Karen Cooper and Richard Young, 'Meeting Expectations: The Application of Restorative Justice to the Police Complaints Process' (Occasional Paper No. 21, Centre for Criminological Research 83 2003) [...]

Abstract: This report presents the findings of a two-year study examining the use of restorative justice within the police complaints system.

ISBN: 0 947811 20 6

2002

C Hoyle, R Young and R Hill, 'Proceed with Caution: An Evaluation of the Thames Valley Police Initiative in Restorative Cautioning' (Joseph Rowntree Foundation 85 2002) [...]

Abstract: This report on the findings of a three-year study conducted in the Thames Valley provides unique insight into the development and achievements of the first large-scale restorative justice programme in the UK.

ISBN: 1-84263-071-7

Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Undergraduate

FHS - Final Year (Phase III)

The degree is awarded on the basis of nine final examinations at the end of the three-year course (or four years in the case of Law with Law Studies in Europe) and (for students who began the course in October 2011 or later) an essay in Jurisprudence written over the summer vacation at the end of the second year. Note: the Jurisprudence exam at the end of the third year is correspondingly shorter. This phase of the Final Honour School includes the first and second term of the final year; the Final Examinations are taken in the third term of the final year.

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Why are criminal laws made? Why are they broken? How do we, and how should we, react to the breaking of criminal laws? These three questions are the stuff of criminology. They also occupy a central and controversial place in public and political debates about the condition and future of contemporary liberal democratic societies. This course provides students with the chance to study them in depth.
Criminology and Criminal Justice offers students an opportunity to study crime and the ways in which it is dealt with by the criminal justice system. It enables students to explore the nature of crime and its control by examining the issues at stake using the resources of legal, penal and social theory. It also offers students the chance to think about crime as a social phenomenon and to explore using criminological research and analysis how criminal justice and penal systems operate in practice.

The course is structured as follows: 18 lectures as well four classes and tutorials

Lectures, classes and tutorials are provided by several academics from the Law Faculty who are also members of the Centre for Criminology.

More information about the Centre for Criminology, including the All Souls Criminology Seminar Series, can be found on the Centre's website.

Diploma in Legal Studies

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Why are criminal laws made? Why are they broken? How do we, and how should we, react to the breaking of criminal laws? These three questions are the stuff of criminology. They also occupy a central and controversial place in public and political debates about the condition and future of contemporary liberal democratic societies. This course provides students with the chance to study them in depth.
Criminology and Criminal Justice offers students an opportunity to study crime and the ways in which it is dealt with by the criminal justice system. It enables students to explore the nature of crime and its control by examining the issues at stake using the resources of legal, penal and social theory. It also offers students the chance to think about crime as a social phenomenon and to explore using criminological research and analysis how criminal justice and penal systems operate in practice.

The course is structured as follows: 18 lectures as well four classes and tutorials

Lectures, classes and tutorials are provided by several academics from the Law Faculty who are also members of the Centre for Criminology.

More information about the Centre for Criminology, including the All Souls Criminology Seminar Series, can be found on the Centre's website.

Postgraduate

BCL

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from common-law backgrounds

Punishment, Security and the State

The proposed course aims to provide an in-depth understanding of the theoretical underpinnings, justifications, and contemporary practices of punishment and security. The subject is approached from criminological, socio-legal, philosophical, and historical perspectives. The course explores the role of the state in the exercise of its most coercive functions against individual citizens – whether punishing those found guilty of criminal wrongdoing or taking security measures against those deemed to pose a risk to the safety of the public and the nation.

In Michaelmas Term it will focus on ‘why we punish’ by examining major debates in penal theory concerning the justification and rationale for punishment (not least desert theory and its critics, communicative and consequentialist theories). The second half of the term will consider ‘how we punish’ by exploring diverse social, economic and political aspects of punishment and examining whether it is possible to do justice to difference.

In Hilary Term the focus will shift from punishment to the pursuit of security and critically examine what is meant by security (whether, for example, as pursuit, commodity, or public good). Successive seminars will consider whether the growth of markets in private security and the development of communal and personal security provision evidence the fragmentation or dispersal of state power. They will go on to examine exercises in state sovereignty in the name of risk management, counterterrorism, and migration and border control. These reassertions of state power permit significant intrusions into individual freedom and the deployment of exceptional measures and the course will address important questions about the limits of legality and the balancing of liberty and security.

In Trinity Term two final seminars will provide an opportunity for critical reflection and engagement with issues raised throughout the course. The first will examine the case for ‘civilizing security’ and consider how security should be pursued, distributed, and governed and by whom; the second returns to the question of punishment to explore the notion of penal excess and the case for penal moderation.

The course will be taught by 12 seminars and 4 tutorials spread across Michaelmas and Hilary Terms (six seminars and two tutorials in each) with 2 further summative seminars in Trinity providing an opportunity for critical reflection on the whole course. The standard exam for the BCL (ie, 3 hour closed book) will be set.

The focus of teaching will be the weekly seminar which all those taking the course are required to attend. Students will be expected to read and think about the assigned materials in advance of the seminar. The seminar will be introduced by a Faculty member, followed by discussion, usually based around a set of questions distributed in advance. In addition the Centre for Criminology organizes seminars during the academic year at which distinguished invited speakers discuss current research or major issues of policy. This programme is advertised on the Centre's website and all students are encouraged to attend.

MJur

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from civil law backgrounds.

Punishment, Security and the State

The proposed course aims to provide an in-depth understanding of the theoretical underpinnings, justifications, and contemporary practices of punishment and security. The subject is approached from criminological, socio-legal, philosophical, and historical perspectives. The course explores the role of the state in the exercise of its most coercive functions against individual citizens – whether punishing those found guilty of criminal wrongdoing or taking security measures against those deemed to pose a risk to the safety of the public and the nation.

In Michaelmas Term it will focus on ‘why we punish’ by examining major debates in penal theory concerning the justification and rationale for punishment (not least desert theory and its critics, communicative and consequentialist theories). The second half of the term will consider ‘how we punish’ by exploring diverse social, economic and political aspects of punishment and examining whether it is possible to do justice to difference.

In Hilary Term the focus will shift from punishment to the pursuit of security and critically examine what is meant by security (whether, for example, as pursuit, commodity, or public good). Successive seminars will consider whether the growth of markets in private security and the development of communal and personal security provision evidence the fragmentation or dispersal of state power. They will go on to examine exercises in state sovereignty in the name of risk management, counterterrorism, and migration and border control. These reassertions of state power permit significant intrusions into individual freedom and the deployment of exceptional measures and the course will address important questions about the limits of legality and the balancing of liberty and security.

In Trinity Term two final seminars will provide an opportunity for critical reflection and engagement with issues raised throughout the course. The first will examine the case for ‘civilizing security’ and consider how security should be pursued, distributed, and governed and by whom; the second returns to the question of punishment to explore the notion of penal excess and the case for penal moderation.

The course will be taught by 12 seminars and 4 tutorials spread across Michaelmas and Hilary Terms (six seminars and two tutorials in each) with 2 further summative seminars in Trinity providing an opportunity for critical reflection on the whole course. The standard exam for the BCL (ie, 3 hour closed book) will be set.

The focus of teaching will be the weekly seminar which all those taking the course are required to attend. Students will be expected to read and think about the assigned materials in advance of the seminar. The seminar will be introduced by a Faculty member, followed by discussion, usually based around a set of questions distributed in advance. In addition the Centre for Criminology organizes seminars during the academic year at which distinguished invited speakers discuss current research or major issues of policy. This programme is advertised on the Centre's website and all students are encouraged to attend.


People

Criminology and Criminal Justice teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

Julian Roberts: Professor of Criminology

in conjunction with:

Andrew Ashworth, QC: Emeritus Vinerian Professor of English Law
Mary Bosworth: Professor of Criminology
Rachel Condry: Associate Professor of Criminology
Carolyn Hoyle: Professor of Criminology
Liora Lazarus: Associate Professor of Law
Ian Loader: Professor of Criminology
Natasha Simonsen: Lecturer in Law, New College
Lucia Zedner: Professor of Criminal Justice

assisted by:

George Mawhinney: DPhil Law student


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