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Criminology — Overview

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For more detailed information about our work in this area, see also the dedicated Centre for Criminology website

This theme contains two subjects, namely: Criminology and Criminology and Criminal Justice


Criminology

Forthcoming Subject Events


October 2014

Criminology Seminar Series
Knowing what we know now. International crimes in historical perspective
Speaker: Prof Willem De Haan, Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, Universtiy of Amsterdam
All Souls College The Old Library at 15:00
Criminology Seminar Series
Title to be confirmed
Speaker: Lord Macdonald QC, and Keir Starmer, QC
All Souls College The Old Library at 15:00

November 2014

Criminology Seminar Series
Immigration Enforcement
Speaker: Prof Jennifer Chacon, School of Law, University of California
All Souls College The Old Library at 15:00

December 2014

Criminology Seminar Series
Title to be confirmed
Speaker: Sarah Forshaw QC and Matt Foot, Solicitor
All Souls College The Old Library at 15:00

News

Annual Roger Hood Lecture: Friday 23rd May

The Centre for Criminology welcomed Professor Kelly Hannah-Moffat to give this year's Annual Roger Hood Public Lecture […]

Centre for Criminology

Building on the successful inaugural open day last year, this year the Centre has arranged an open day to showcase research and career opportunities outside the University sector […]

Roger Hood Annual Public Lecture 2014

Friday 23 May 17:00 - Manor Road Building Lecture Theatre

Moving targets: Reputational Risk, rights and accountability in punishment - Professor Kelly Hannah-Moffat,

This lecture will comment on how institutional concerns about prevention, reputational risk and human rights have produced forms of accountability that facilitate persistent, systemic problems […]

Leverhulme International Network on External Border Control

photo of Mary BosworthThe Centre for Criminology is pleased to announce the Leverhulme International Network on External Border Control lead by Mary Bosworth […]

Investigating Adolescent Violence towards Parents

photo of Rachel Condry

Rachel Condry (University Lecturer at the Centre for Criminology and a Fellow of St Hilda's College) has recently conducted a three-year research project on adolescent-to-parent violence funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) […]

Making and Breaking Barriers: Assessing the value of mounted police units in the UK

Ben Bradford has been awarded a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to research mounted police in the UK, the 12 month project, which is being run in conjunction with RAND and the Association of Chief Police Officers, starts in October 2013 […]

Professor Carolyn Hoyle

photo of Carolyn Hoyle

Professor Carolyn Hoyle has been awarded a £110,338 Research Grant from The Leverhulme Trust to conduct a two-year project on 'Last Resorts: Decisions and Discretion at the Criminal Cases Review Commission' […]

The Roger Hood Public Lecture 23 May 2013

photo of Andrew Ashworth

Criminology has had a home in Oxford for over fifty years and has thrived under the leadership of Professor Roger Hood since 1973, first as an independent unit within the University and, since 1991 as an integral department of the Faculty of Law […]

ESRC-funded seminar series on immigration detention

Mary Bosworth is part of an interdisciplinary team from the Universities of Oxford, York, Birmingham, Lancaster and Exeter who have been granted funds from the ESRC to hold a seminar series entitled 'Exploring Everyday Practice and Resistance in Immigration Detention' […]

Discussion Groups

These self-sustaining groups are an essential part of the life of our graduate school. They are organised in some cases by graduate students and in others by Faculty members and meet regularly during term, typically over a sandwich lunch, when one of the group presents work in progress or introduces a discussion of a particular issue or new case. They may also encompass guest speakers from the faculty and beyond.

Criminology Discussion Group

Publications

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2014

I Loader and R Sparks, 'Beyond Mass Incarceration?' (2014) 23 The Good Society 114

M Bosworth, 'Citizenship and Belonging in a Women\'s Immigration Detention Centre' in C Phillips and C Webster (eds), New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime (Routledge 2014) (forthcoming)

C Hoyle and N Palmer, 'Family justice centres: A model for empowerment?' (2014) 20 International Review of Victimology 1 [...]

The London Borough of Croydon, in the south of England, established, in December 2005, a Family Justice Centre (FJC) to respond in a flexible way to meet the varied needs of those abused in intimate relationships. The FJC brings together some 33 agencies under one roof. This article draws on a small, grounded pilot study of the Croydon FJC – the first study of a FJC in the UK  to consider if the co-location and cooperation of services to victims of domestic abuse has the potential to empower victims to make informed choices about their futures.


ISBN: 0269-7580

B Bradford, J Jackson and M Hough, 'Police legitimacy in action: lessons for theory and practice' in M Reisig and R Kane (eds), Oxford handbook of police and policing (Oxford University Press 2014) (forthcoming)

B Bradford, 'Policing and social identity: procedural justice, inclusion and cooperation between police and public' (2014) 24 Policing and Society 22 [...]

DOI: 10.1080/10439463.2012.724068

Accounts of the social meaning of policing and of the relationship between police and citizen converge on the idea that police behaviour carries important identity-relevant information. Opinions of and ideas about the police are implicated in the formation of social identities that relate to the social groups it represents – nation, state and community. Procedural justice theory suggests that judgements about the fairness of the police will be the most important factor in such processes. Fairness promotes a sense of inclusion and value, while unfairness communicates denigration and exclusion. Furthermore, positive social identities in relation to the police should on this account promote cooperation with it. This article presents an empirical test of these ideas in the context of the British policing. Data from a survey of young Londoners are used to show that perceptions of police fairness are indeed associated with social identity, and in turn social identity can be linked to cooperation. Yet these relationships were much stronger among those with multiple national identities. Police behaviour appeared more identity relevant for people who felt that they were citizens of a non-UK country, but for those who identified only as British there was a weaker link between procedural fairness and social identity, and here legitimacy judgements were the main ‘drivers’ of cooperation. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.


Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Postgraduate

MSc

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Please visit the course pages on the Centre for Criminology's dedicated website.

Criminology and Criminal Justice (Research Methods)

Please visit the course pages on the Centre for Criminology's dedicated website.


People

Criminology teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

Rachel Condry: Associate Professor of Criminology

in conjunction with:

Mary Bosworth: Professor of Criminology
Carolyn Hoyle: Professor of Criminology
Ian Loader: Professor of Criminology
Julian Roberts: Professor of Criminology
Lucia Zedner: Professor of Criminal Justice

Also working in this field, but not involved in its teaching programme:

Clara Feliciati: DPhil Law student
Arushi Garg: MPhil Law student
Roger Hood: Emeritus Professor of Criminology and Fellow of All Souls College, and former Director of the Centre for Criminological Research
George Mawhinney: DPhil Law student
Leila Ullrich: DPhil Criminology student
Marion Vannier: DPhil Criminology student
Federico Varese: Professor of Criminology

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Criminology and Criminal Justice

Discussion Groups

These self-sustaining groups are an essential part of the life of our graduate school. They are organised in some cases by graduate students and in others by Faculty members and meet regularly during term, typically over a sandwich lunch, when one of the group presents work in progress or introduces a discussion of a particular issue or new case. They may also encompass guest speakers from the faculty and beyond.

Police and Policing Research Discussion Group

Publications

Showing five recent publications sorted by year, then title  [change this]

Showing 5 of the most recent publications
Change to sort them by title | name | type OR
Show All 81 | Selected publications

2015

M Bosworth and Turnbull, Sarah, 'Immigration Detention and the Expansion of Penal Power in the UK' in K. Reiter and A. Koenig. (eds), Extreme Punishment (Palgrave 2015)

M Bosworth, 'Immigration Detention, Ambivalence and the Colonial Other ' in Eriksson, Anna (eds), Punishing the Other (Routledge 2015)

M Bosworth, I Hasselberg and S Turnbull, 'Imprisonment in a Global Age: Rethinking Penal Power' in Y Jewkes, B Crewe and J Bennett (eds), Handbook of Prisons (Sage Publications 2015)

2014

M Bosworth, 'Immigration Detention' in S Pickering (ed), Routledge Handbook on Crime and Migration ( 2014) (forthcoming)

M Bosworth and G Slade, 'In Search of Recognition: Gender and Staff-Detainee Relations in a British Immigration Removal Centre' (2014) 16 Punishment & Society (forthcoming)

Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Undergraduate

FHS - Final Year (Phase III)

The degree is awarded on the basis of nine final examinations at the end of the three-year course (or four years in the case of Law with Law Studies in Europe) and (for students who began the course in October 2011 or later) an essay in Jurisprudence written over the summer vacation at the end of the second year. Note: the Jurisprudence exam at the end of the third year is correspondingly shorter. This phase of the Final Honour School includes the first and second term of the final year; the Final Examinations are taken in the third term of the final year.

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Why are criminal laws made? Why are they broken? How do we, and how should we, react to the breaking of criminal laws? These three questions are the stuff of criminology. They also occupy a central and controversial place in public and political debates about the condition and future of contemporary liberal democratic societies. This course provides students with the chance to study them in depth.
Criminology and Criminal Justice offers students an opportunity to study crime and the ways in which it is dealt with by the criminal justice system. It enables students to explore the nature of crime and its control by examining the issues at stake using the resources of legal, penal and social theory. It also offers students the chance to think about crime as a social phenomenon and to explore using criminological research and analysis how criminal justice and penal systems operate in practice.

The course is structured as follows: 18 lectures as well four classes and tutorials

Lectures, classes and tutorials are provided by several academics from the Law Faculty who are also members of the Centre for Criminology.

More information about the Centre for Criminology, including the All Souls Criminology Seminar Series, can be found on the Centre's website.

Diploma in Legal Studies

Criminology and Criminal Justice

Why are criminal laws made? Why are they broken? How do we, and how should we, react to the breaking of criminal laws? These three questions are the stuff of criminology. They also occupy a central and controversial place in public and political debates about the condition and future of contemporary liberal democratic societies. This course provides students with the chance to study them in depth.
Criminology and Criminal Justice offers students an opportunity to study crime and the ways in which it is dealt with by the criminal justice system. It enables students to explore the nature of crime and its control by examining the issues at stake using the resources of legal, penal and social theory. It also offers students the chance to think about crime as a social phenomenon and to explore using criminological research and analysis how criminal justice and penal systems operate in practice.

The course is structured as follows: 18 lectures as well four classes and tutorials

Lectures, classes and tutorials are provided by several academics from the Law Faculty who are also members of the Centre for Criminology.

More information about the Centre for Criminology, including the All Souls Criminology Seminar Series, can be found on the Centre's website.

Postgraduate

BCL

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from common-law backgrounds

Punishment, Security and the State

The proposed course aims to provide an in-depth understanding of the theoretical underpinnings, justifications, and contemporary practices of punishment and security. The subject is approached from criminological, socio-legal, philosophical, and historical perspectives. The course explores the role of the state in the exercise of its most coercive functions against individual citizens – whether punishing those found guilty of criminal wrongdoing or taking security measures against those deemed to pose a risk to the safety of the public and the nation.

In Michaelmas Term it will focus on ‘why we punish’ by examining major debates in penal theory concerning the justification and rationale for punishment (not least desert theory and its critics, communicative and consequentialist theories). The second half of the term will consider ‘how we punish’ by exploring diverse social, economic and political aspects of punishment and examining whether it is possible to do justice to difference.

In Hilary Term the focus will shift from punishment to the pursuit of security and critically examine what is meant by security (whether, for example, as pursuit, commodity, or public good). Successive seminars will consider whether the growth of markets in private security and the development of communal and personal security provision evidence the fragmentation or dispersal of state power. They will go on to examine exercises in state sovereignty in the name of risk management, counterterrorism, and migration and border control. These reassertions of state power permit significant intrusions into individual freedom and the deployment of exceptional measures and the course will address important questions about the limits of legality and the balancing of liberty and security.

In Trinity Term two final seminars will provide an opportunity for critical reflection and engagement with issues raised throughout the course. The first will examine the case for ‘civilizing security’ and consider how security should be pursued, distributed, and governed and by whom; the second returns to the question of punishment to explore the notion of penal excess and the case for penal moderation.

The course will be taught by 12 seminars and 4 tutorials spread across Michaelmas and Hilary Terms (six seminars and two tutorials in each) with 2 further summative seminars in Trinity providing an opportunity for critical reflection on the whole course. The standard exam for the BCL (ie, 3 hour closed book) will be set.

The focus of teaching will be the weekly seminar which all those taking the course are required to attend. Students will be expected to read and think about the assigned materials in advance of the seminar. The seminar will be introduced by a Faculty member, followed by discussion, usually based around a set of questions distributed in advance. In addition the Centre for Criminology organizes seminars during the academic year at which distinguished invited speakers discuss current research or major issues of policy. This programme is advertised on the Centre's website and all students are encouraged to attend.

MJur

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from civil law backgrounds.

Punishment, Security and the State

The proposed course aims to provide an in-depth understanding of the theoretical underpinnings, justifications, and contemporary practices of punishment and security. The subject is approached from criminological, socio-legal, philosophical, and historical perspectives. The course explores the role of the state in the exercise of its most coercive functions against individual citizens – whether punishing those found guilty of criminal wrongdoing or taking security measures against those deemed to pose a risk to the safety of the public and the nation.

In Michaelmas Term it will focus on ‘why we punish’ by examining major debates in penal theory concerning the justification and rationale for punishment (not least desert theory and its critics, communicative and consequentialist theories). The second half of the term will consider ‘how we punish’ by exploring diverse social, economic and political aspects of punishment and examining whether it is possible to do justice to difference.

In Hilary Term the focus will shift from punishment to the pursuit of security and critically examine what is meant by security (whether, for example, as pursuit, commodity, or public good). Successive seminars will consider whether the growth of markets in private security and the development of communal and personal security provision evidence the fragmentation or dispersal of state power. They will go on to examine exercises in state sovereignty in the name of risk management, counterterrorism, and migration and border control. These reassertions of state power permit significant intrusions into individual freedom and the deployment of exceptional measures and the course will address important questions about the limits of legality and the balancing of liberty and security.

In Trinity Term two final seminars will provide an opportunity for critical reflection and engagement with issues raised throughout the course. The first will examine the case for ‘civilizing security’ and consider how security should be pursued, distributed, and governed and by whom; the second returns to the question of punishment to explore the notion of penal excess and the case for penal moderation.

The course will be taught by 12 seminars and 4 tutorials spread across Michaelmas and Hilary Terms (six seminars and two tutorials in each) with 2 further summative seminars in Trinity providing an opportunity for critical reflection on the whole course. The standard exam for the BCL (ie, 3 hour closed book) will be set.

The focus of teaching will be the weekly seminar which all those taking the course are required to attend. Students will be expected to read and think about the assigned materials in advance of the seminar. The seminar will be introduced by a Faculty member, followed by discussion, usually based around a set of questions distributed in advance. In addition the Centre for Criminology organizes seminars during the academic year at which distinguished invited speakers discuss current research or major issues of policy. This programme is advertised on the Centre's website and all students are encouraged to attend.


People

Criminology and Criminal Justice teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

Julian Roberts: Professor of Criminology

in conjunction with:

Mary Bosworth: Professor of Criminology
Rachel Condry: Associate Professor of Criminology
Carolyn Hoyle: Professor of Criminology
Liora Lazarus: Associate Professor of Law
Ian Loader: Professor of Criminology
Natasha Simonsen: Stipendiary Lecturer in Law, St Annes College
Lucia Zedner: Professor of Criminal Justice

assisted by:

George Mawhinney: DPhil Law student

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