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Intellectual Property Law — Overview

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For more detailed information about our work in this area, see also the dedicated Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre website

Forthcoming Subject Events


November 2014

Intellectual Property Discussion Group
Contract, Coordination, and Public Goods: The Example of News
Speaker: Jonathan Silberstein-Loeb, New York University, USA.
Oxford Law Faculty Senior Common Room at 11:30
IP Speaker Series
The role of surveys in Trade Mark and Passing Off cases
Speaker: Jeremy Dickerson, Burges Salmon
St Peter's College The Dorfman Room at 17:15
Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre
German Copyright Law Reform
Speaker: Professor Ansgar Ohly, University of Oxford and University of Munich
St Hilda's College Brodie Room at 17:00
IP Speaker Series
The right of communication to the public in the CJEU case law: moving criteria and underlying rationale
Speaker: Professor Alain Strowel, Saint-Louis Brussels, Munich IP Law Center, Avocat at the Brussels Bar
St Peter's College The Dorfman Room at 17:15
Intellectual Property Discussion Group
Student Day
Speaker: Graduate Research Students (IP), University of Oxford
Oxford Law Faculty Senior Common Room at 11:30
IP Speaker Series
Copyright and creators
Speaker: Professor Martin Senftleben, VU University of Amsterdam
St Peter's College The Dorfman Room at 17:15
IP Speaker Series
Debating copyright formalities
Speaker: Dr Dev Gangjee, University of Oxford
St Peter's College The Dorfman Room at 17:15

December 2014

Intellectual Property Discussion Group
Major Changes to Canada's IP Regime: Protecting and Enforcing Copyright and Trademarks Internationally
Speaker: Rob McDonald QC, Dentons Canada LLP.
Oxford Law Faculty Senior Common Room at 11:30

News

OIPRC signs Memorandum of Understanding with the Center for Intellectual Property Studies (CEIPI), Strasbourg

The Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Center for Intellectual Property Studies (CEIPI) at the University of Strasbourg formalising a commitment to collaborate on a number of projects, including conferences and faculty and student exchanges […]

IP Diploma Alumni Event

The Faculty of Law hosted its annual Diploma in Intellectual Property Law & Practice Alumni Reception at the Royal Society in London on 6 March 2014 […]

Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot 2014

The annual Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot was held at the Faculty of Law and Pembroke College from 20 to 22 March 2014 […]

Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot and Conversazione 2013

Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot 2013

The annual Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot was held at the Faculty of Law and Pembroke College from 14 to 16 March 2013 […]

The 2012 International Intellectual Property Moot and Conversazione

The annual International Intellectual Property Moot and Conversazione were held on 16 and 17 March 2012 at St Catherine’s College […]

Pattishall Medal for excellence and innovation in teaching

The Oxford Law Faculty congratulates Professor Vaver, Emeritus Professor of Intellectual Property & Information Technology Law, on being awarded the Pattishall Medal for excellence and innovation in teaching of subjects related to trademarks and trade identity, having been nominated by one of his former students […]

Oxford Diploma in Intellectual Property Law and Practice Alumni Drinks Reception and Talk

On Tuesday 28 February, the Faculty of Law hosted the first Diploma in Intellectual Property Law and Practice Alumni Drinks and Talk at the Oxford Cambridge Club in London […]

International Intellectual Property Moot 2011

The annual International Intellectual Property Moot was held on 18 and 19 March 2011.  A record number of submissions were received this year […]

International Intellectual Property Moot 2010

St Catherine’s College on Saturday 20th March saw the conclusion of the Oxford IP Research Centre (OIPRC)’s eighth annual mooting competition, hosted for the first time by its new Director, Professor Graeme Dinwoodie […]

Professor Graeme Dinwoodie elected to Oxford Chair in Intellectual Property Law

Professor Graeme Dinwoodie has been named as Professor of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law at Oxford University […]

New IP Diploma begins

The Oxford Diploma in IP Law and Practice has begun, with a two-week intensive course last month for 55 early-career practitioners taking the course […]

OIPRC becomes an official centre of the Law Faculty

In October 2008 the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre (OIPRC) became a Centre of the Oxford Law Faculty, taking its place alongside an increasing number of multidisciplinary centres […]

New IP Diploma is approved

The Oxford Diploma in Intellectual Property Law and Practice has been approved by the University’s Educational Policy and Standards Committee, and will run from 2008-9 […]

Inaugural International Intellectual Property Moot

The International IP Moot ran on 22 and 23 March 2003 […]

Discussion Groups

These self-sustaining groups are an essential part of the life of our graduate school. They are organised in some cases by graduate students and in others by Faculty members and meet regularly during term, typically over a sandwich lunch, when one of the group presents work in progress or introduces a discussion of a particular issue or new case. They may also encompass guest speakers from the faculty and beyond.

Intellectual Property Discussion Group

Publications

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2013

E Hudson, 'Implementing Fair Use in Copyright Law: Lessons from Australia' (2013) 25 Intellectual Property Journal 201

R Burrell and E Hudson, 'Property Concepts in European Law: The Case for Abandonment' in H Howe and J Griffiths (eds), Concepts of Property in Intellectual Property Law (Cambridge University Press 2013)

2012

G Dinwoodie and R. C. Dreyfuss, A Neofederalist Vision of TRIPS: The Resilience of the International Intellectual Property Regime (Oxford Univ. Press 2012) [...]

The TRIPS Agreement (Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights), signed on April 15, 1994, introduced intellectual property protection into the World Trade Organization's multilateral trading system, and it remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date. A Neofederalist Vision of TRIPS by Graeme B. Dinwoodie and Rochelle C. Dreyfuss examines its interpretation, its impact on the creative environment, and its effect on national and international lawmaking. It propounds a vision of TRIPS as creating a neofederalist regime, one that will ensure the resilience of the international intellectual property system in time of rapid change. In this vision, WTO members retain considerable flexibility to tailor intellectual property law to their national priorities and to experiment with changes necessary to meet new technological and social challenges, but agree to operate within an international framework. This framework, while less powerful than the central administration of a federal government, comprises a series of substantive and procedural commitments that promote the coordination of both the present intellectual property system as well as future international intellectual property lawmaking. Part I demonstrates the centrality of state autonomy throughout the history of international negotiations over intellectual property. Part II, which looks at the present, analyzes the decisions of the WTO in intellectual property cases. It concludes that the WTO has been inattentive to the benefits of promoting cultural diversity, the values inherent in intellectual property, the rich fabric of its law and lore, the necessary balance between producers and users of knowledge goods, and the relationship between the law and the technological environment in which it must operate. Looking to the future, Part III develops a framework for integrating the increasingly fragmented international system and proposes the recognition of an international intellectual property acquis, a set of longstanding principles that have informed, and should continue to inform intellectual property lawmaking. The acquis would include both express and latent components of the international regime, put access-regarding guarantees such as user rights on a par with proprietary interests and enshrine the fundamental importance of national autonomy in the international system.


ISBN: ISBN13: 978019530461

2011

E Hudson and R Burrell, 'Copyright, Abandonment and Orphaned Works: What Does it Mean to Take the Proprietary Nature of Intellectual Property Rights Seriously?' (2011) 35 Melbourne University Law Review 971 [...]

For many years there was doubt as to whether personal property could be abandoned. In more recent times, however, the existence of a doctrine of abandonment has been solidifying in relation to chattels. In this article the authors suggest that copyright works can also be abandoned. This conclusion has significant implications for cultural institutions and other users struggling to deal with so-called ‘orphaned works’. More generally, the authors suggest that recognising that abandonment of copyright is possible has repercussions for how we think about intellectual property rights and, in particular, should cause us to look more closely at other doctrines within the law of personal property that might limit intellectual property’s reach.


ISBN: 0025-8938

2010

G Dinwoodie, 'The Common Law and Trade Marks in an Age of Statutes' in Bently, Ng & D’Agostino (eds), The Common Law of Intellectual Property: Essays in Honour of Professor David Vaver (Hart Publishing 2010) [...]

In 1879, the United States Supreme Court recognized that trade marks are a creature of the common law. Likewise, the English courts had long recognized causes of action that effectively protected marks prior to the enactment of statutes delineating the scope of trademark protection. The characterization of trade mark law as a field of common law may, however, now seem an essentially historical statement. In the United States, the early twentieth century saw the adoption of a series of federal trademark registration statutes, and in 1946 Congress enacted even more comprehensive trademark legislation, namely the Lanham Act. Since then, Congress, has episodically - but with increasing frequency - revised the trademark statute. In light of such increased statutorification of trade mark law, what is the continued role of the common law in developing appropriate protection for trade marks? In this chapter, I recount the development of the common law of trade marks, highlighting the background developments outside trademark law that influenced the allocation of trademark lawmaking authority over the course of the twentieth century. The historical importance of these external influences suggests that trademark law will not be immune to changes in contemporary judicial philosophy that have made some scholars fearful about the room for further common law development. However, a brief review of recent Congressional activity and Supreme Court opinions in the field suggests that, despite substantial legislative intervention, both Congress and the Supreme Court appear content that the development of trademark and unfair competition law in the United States remain a partnership between the two institutions, and thus heavily dependent on common law lawmaking by the courts.


ISBN: 9781841139708

2009

G Dinwoodie, 'Developing a Private International Intellectual Property Law: The Demise of Territoriality? ' (2009) 51 Wiiliam & Mary Law Review 711 [...]

Although intellectual property law is a relatively recent legal innovation, it has from an early stage in its development possessed an international dimension. As far back as the late nineteenth century, this resulted in the adoption of a group of multinational treaties that remain the foundation of what can be called the public international law of intellectual property. Efforts to develop a private international law of intellectual property are much more recent, and are ongoing in a number of different institutional settings. Yet, the need for attention to this field remains acute. This Article explores the content of a private international law of intellectual property. It does not seek to articulate a comprehensive scheme. Rather, this exploration is intended to facilitate consideration of the core principle of territoriality that informs so much of the existing regime. The Article sketches the basic principles of private international law that apply in transborder intellectual property disputes, examining treaty provisions and developments at the national and regional level. Some of the leading questions are highlighted by discussion of six recent transborder intellectual property disputes. These disputes help to illustrate aspects of cross-border exploitation of intellectual property that need to be taken into account both in critiquing current approaches and in formulating alternatives. The Article then turns to focus on the concept of territoriality. Territoriality is a principle that has always received excessive doctrinal purchase in intellectual property law. Moreover, the normative force of the principle has declined as units of social and commercial organization have come to correspond less neatly with national borders, and as private ordering has weakened the capacity (and perhaps the claim) of the nation-state exclusively to determine the behavior of its citizenry. Finally, many of the same values (for example, diversity of legal regimes, tailoring of intellectual property to local needs, and protecting rights on an international basis) that the public international intellectual property system sought to further through its promulgation of the principle of territoriality can now best (and perhaps only) be achieved by reconfiguring the principle. This Article approaches the task of reconfiguration in two ways. First, it explores some of the different ways in which the principle of territoriality might conceptually inform a private international law of intellectual property. Contemporary multi-territorial intellectual property disputes are characterized by an excess of shared but weaker prescriptive and adjudicatory authority. The Article suggests a restrained concept of territoriality that reflects that reality, drawing in particular from the treatment of extra-territoriality in trademark law. The Article also approaches the question less conceptually and proposes liberalization of a specific principle of private international intellectual property law: limits on consolidated adjudication of infringement claims under domestic and foreign intellectual property laws.


ISBN: 0043-5589

G Dinwoodie, 'Lewis & Clark College of Law Ninth Distinguished IP Lecture: Developing Defenses in Trademark Law' (2009) 13 Lewis & Clark Law Review 99 [...]

Trademark law contains important limits that place a range of third party conduct beyond the control of the trademark owner. However, I suggest that trademark law would be better served if several of its limits were explicitly conceptualized as defenses to an action for infringement, that is, as rules permitting unauthorized uses of marks even where such uses implicate the affirmative concerns of trademark law and thus support a prima facie cause of action by the trademark owner. To explore why this distinction between limits and defenses matters, I discuss the different nature of the proscription imposed by copyright and trademark law. And I draw lessons both from case law deriving limits from interpretation of the proscription of trademark law as well as from the development of statutory defenses to dilution. Conceiving of limits as defenses would help ensure that the (often unstated) values underlying socially desirable third party uses are not too readily disregarded if they happen to conflict with confusion-avoidance concerns that are historically powerful drivers of trademark protection. Such an approach would also ameliorate the uncertainties caused by the acceptance of extended (and increasingly amorphous) notions of actionable harm in trademark law. And it would facilitate a more transparent debate about the different forms that limits on trademark rights might take. Some defenses will operate as mechanisms by which to balance competing policy concerns on a case-by-case basis, while others (reflecting more fundamental normative commitments, or driven by more proceduralist concerns) might allow certain values categorically to trump the basic policy concerns supporting liability for trademark infringement. Full development of these defenses will involve courts adopting a conscious understanding of the different jurisprudential nature of defenses and will be made easier by acceptance of the Lanham Act as a delegating statute.


ISBN: 1557-6582

Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Undergraduate

FHS - Final Year (Phase III)

The degree is awarded on the basis of nine final examinations at the end of the three-year course (or four years in the case of Law with Law Studies in Europe) and (for students who began the course in October 2011 or later) an essay in Jurisprudence written over the summer vacation at the end of the second year. Note: the Jurisprudence exam at the end of the third year is correspondingly shorter. This phase of the Final Honour School includes the first and second term of the final year; the Final Examinations are taken in the third term of the final year.

Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights

It is commonplace to claim that we live in an information and technological age, and that rights in creative and informational works, and in technology, are becoming increasingly important. In this course we introduce two of the central regimes for the protection of those rights – copyright and patent law - and their allied regimes. Copyright protects authorial works and recordings/transmissions of them, and is supported by the moral rights and performance rights regimes (which give authors and performers additional rights in respect of their works and performances). Patent law protects inventions, ie, technical ideas for doing things of use in industry (such as making drugs and drilling for oil). We ask why we have these regimes and how they operate at a national and European level. The course should appeal to those interested in the arts and entertainment industries, publishing, literary theory, information technology, research and development, trade, unfair competition, medical law and ethics, European harmonisation, EU law, science and intellectual property practice. It will be taught in eight two-hour seminars and six one-hour tutorials spread over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms by Lord L Hoffmann and Dr J Pila.

NOTE: MJuris and DLS students are welcome to take this course. The course may not be taken in conjunction with Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied Rights.

 

Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied Rights

It is commonplace to claim that we live in an information and consumer age, and that rights in creative and informational works, and in words, logos and other signs used in trade, are becoming increasingly important. In this course we introduce two of the central regimes for the protection of those rights – copyright and trade mark law – and certain of their allied regimes. Copyright protects authorial works and recordings/transmissions of them, and is supported by the moral rights and performance rights regimes (which give authors and performers additional rights in respect of their works and performances). Trade mark law protects signs that indicate the commercial origin of goods and services, and is supported by the passing off action (which protects against certain unauthorized uses of information to mislead or deceive the market). We ask why we have these regimes and how they operate at a national and European level. The course should appeal to those interested in the arts and entertainment industries, publishing, literary theory, brand management, European harmonisation, EU law, unfair competition and intellectual property practice. It will be taught in eight two-hour seminars and six one-hour tutorials spread over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms by Dr J Pila and Dr D Gangjee.

NOTE: MJuris and DLS students are welcome to take this course. The course may not be taken in conjunction with Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights.

Diploma in Legal Studies

Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights

It is commonplace to claim that we live in an information and technological age, and that rights in creative and informational works, and in technology, are becoming increasingly important. In this course we introduce two of the central regimes for the protection of those rights – copyright and patent law - and their allied regimes. Copyright protects authorial works and recordings/transmissions of them, and is supported by the moral rights and performance rights regimes (which give authors and performers additional rights in respect of their works and performances). Patent law protects inventions, ie, technical ideas for doing things of use in industry (such as making drugs and drilling for oil). We ask why we have these regimes and how they operate at a national and European level. The course should appeal to those interested in the arts and entertainment industries, publishing, literary theory, information technology, research and development, trade, unfair competition, medical law and ethics, European harmonisation, EU law, science and intellectual property practice. It will be taught in eight two-hour seminars and six one-hour tutorials spread over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms by Lord L Hoffmann and Dr J Pila.

NOTE: MJuris and DLS students are welcome to take this course. The course may not be taken in conjunction with Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied Rights.

 

Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied Rights

It is commonplace to claim that we live in an information and consumer age, and that rights in creative and informational works, and in words, logos and other signs used in trade, are becoming increasingly important. In this course we introduce two of the central regimes for the protection of those rights – copyright and trade mark law – and certain of their allied regimes. Copyright protects authorial works and recordings/transmissions of them, and is supported by the moral rights and performance rights regimes (which give authors and performers additional rights in respect of their works and performances). Trade mark law protects signs that indicate the commercial origin of goods and services, and is supported by the passing off action (which protects against certain unauthorized uses of information to mislead or deceive the market). We ask why we have these regimes and how they operate at a national and European level. The course should appeal to those interested in the arts and entertainment industries, publishing, literary theory, brand management, European harmonisation, EU law, unfair competition and intellectual property practice. It will be taught in eight two-hour seminars and six one-hour tutorials spread over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms by Dr J Pila and Dr D Gangjee.

NOTE: MJuris and DLS students are welcome to take this course. The course may not be taken in conjunction with Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights.

Postgraduate

BCL

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from common-law backgrounds

Intellectual Property Law

The course in Intellectual Property Law covers all the main forms of intellectual property (principally, copyright, trade mark and unfair competition, and patent, but we also touch on trade secrets). It explores the theoretical foundations of and justification for the different rights as well as their application in a number of settings. Intellectual property industries now make up a sizable proportion of the global economy. And the most contested issues in intellectual property law are closely connected to developments throughout the arts and technology, as well as to evolutions in marketing and popular culture. Thus the course will be of interest to students from a number of backgrounds and with a variety of interests. In the United Kingdom, intellectual property law is increasingly Europeanised, so we necessarily examine the European instruments and case law that shape UK law. And because the content of intellectual property law is increasingly framed by international obligations and evolves with some regard to developments in other countries, the course also has an international and comparative dimension. The course is suitable for students with or without undergraduate experience of IP law. It is taught by Professor Graeme Dinwoodie, Professor Ansgar Ohly, Dr Justine Pila, Dr Dev Gangjee, Dr. Emily Hudson and Ms. Daniela Simone in a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials over Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity Terms. Teaching is through sixteen seminars. The seminars are supported by introductory lectures (one at the beginning of the course and the others are strategically situated throughout the course), and by the provision of six tutorials. Reading lists are posted using Weblearn. With prior permission, it may also be possible to accommodate a small number of auditors in the undergraduate Copyright, Trade Mark and Patents seminars of Dr. Pila, Dr. Gangjee, and Lord Hoffmann; for permission as regards Copyright and Patents, please write to Dr Pila, and as regards Trade Marks please write to Dr. Gangjee. (MJur students may enrol in an undergraduate IP option provided they are not taking this M Jur course in Intellectual Property Law.)  Note that this course has sometimes previously been called International IP Law, or European IP Law.

The course will be taught by Professor Dinwoodie, Professor Ohly, Dr Gangjee, Dr Hudson, Dr Pila and Ms. Simone in a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials held in Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity Terms.

MJur

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from civil law backgrounds.

Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights (also part of the BA course)

It is commonplace to claim that we live in an information and technological age, and that rights in creative and informational works, and in technology, are becoming increasingly important. In this course we introduce two of the central regimes for the protection of those rights – copyright and patent law - and their allied regimes. Copyright protects authorial works and recordings/transmissions of them, and is supported by the moral rights and performance rights regimes (which give authors and performers additional rights in respect of their works and performances). Patent law protects inventions, ie, technical ideas for doing things of use in industry (such as making drugs and drilling for oil). We ask why we have these regimes and how they operate at a national and European level. The course should appeal to those interested in the arts and entertainment industries, publishing, literary theory, information technology, research and development, trade, unfair competition, medical law and ethics, European harmonisation, EU law, science and intellectual property practice. It will be taught in eight two-hour seminars and six one-hour tutorials spread over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms by Lord L Hoffmann and Dr J Pila.

NOTE: MJuris and DLS students are welcome to take this course. The course may not be taken in conjunction with Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied Rights.

 

Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied Rights (also part of the BA course)

It is commonplace to claim that we live in an information and consumer age, and that rights in creative and informational works, and in words, logos and other signs used in trade, are becoming increasingly important. In this course we introduce two of the central regimes for the protection of those rights – copyright and trade mark law – and certain of their allied regimes. Copyright protects authorial works and recordings/transmissions of them, and is supported by the moral rights and performance rights regimes (which give authors and performers additional rights in respect of their works and performances). Trade mark law protects signs that indicate the commercial origin of goods and services, and is supported by the passing off action (which protects against certain unauthorized uses of information to mislead or deceive the market). We ask why we have these regimes and how they operate at a national and European level. The course should appeal to those interested in the arts and entertainment industries, publishing, literary theory, brand management, European harmonisation, EU law, unfair competition and intellectual property practice. It will be taught in eight two-hour seminars and six one-hour tutorials spread over Michaelmas and Hilary Terms by Dr J Pila and Dr D Gangjee.

NOTE: MJuris and DLS students are welcome to take this course. The course may not be taken in conjunction with Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights.

Intellectual Property Law

The course in Intellectual Property Law covers all the main forms of intellectual property (principally, copyright, trade mark and unfair competition, and patent, but we also touch on trade secrets). It explores the theoretical foundations of and justification for the different rights as well as their application in a number of settings. Intellectual property industries now make up a sizable proportion of the global economy. And the most contested issues in intellectual property law are closely connected to developments throughout the arts and technology, as well as to evolutions in marketing and popular culture. Thus the course will be of interest to students from a number of backgrounds and with a variety of interests. In the United Kingdom, intellectual property law is increasingly Europeanised, so we necessarily examine the European instruments and case law that shape UK law. And because the content of intellectual property law is increasingly framed by international obligations and evolves with some regard to developments in other countries, the course also has an international and comparative dimension. The course is suitable for students with or without undergraduate experience of IP law. It is taught by Professor Graeme Dinwoodie, Professor Ansgar Ohly, Dr Justine Pila, Dr Dev Gangjee, Dr. Emily Hudson and Ms. Daniela Simone in a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials over Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity Terms. Teaching is through sixteen seminars. The seminars are supported by introductory lectures (one at the beginning of the course and the others are strategically situated throughout the course), and by the provision of six tutorials. Reading lists are posted using Weblearn. With prior permission, it may also be possible to accommodate a small number of auditors in the undergraduate Copyright, Trade Mark and Patents seminars of Dr. Pila, Dr. Gangjee, and Lord Hoffmann; for permission as regards Copyright and Patents, please write to Dr Pila, and as regards Trade Marks please write to Dr. Gangjee. (MJur students may enrol in an undergraduate IP option provided they are not taking this M Jur course in Intellectual Property Law.)  Note that this course has sometimes previously been called International IP Law, or European IP Law.

The course will be taught by Professor Dinwoodie, Professor Ohly, Dr Gangjee, Dr Hudson, Dr Pila and Ms. Simone in a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials held in Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity Terms.

MSc (Master's in Law and Finance)

Intellectual Property Law

The course in Intellectual Property Law covers all the main forms of intellectual property (principally, copyright, trade mark and unfair competition, and patent, but we also touch on trade secrets). It explores the theoretical foundations of and justification for the different rights as well as their application in a number of settings. Intellectual property industries now make up a sizable proportion of the global economy. And the most contested issues in intellectual property law are closely connected to developments throughout the arts and technology, as well as to evolutions in marketing and popular culture. Thus the course will be of interest to students from a number of backgrounds and with a variety of interests. In the United Kingdom, intellectual property law is increasingly Europeanised, so we necessarily examine the European instruments and case law that shape UK law. And because the content of intellectual property law is increasingly framed by international obligations and evolves with some regard to developments in other countries, the course also has an international and comparative dimension. The course is suitable for students with or without undergraduate experience of IP law. It is taught by Professor Graeme Dinwoodie, Professor Ansgar Ohly, Dr Justine Pila, Dr Dev Gangjee, Dr. Emily Hudson and Ms. Daniela Simone in a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials over Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity Terms. Teaching is through sixteen seminars. The seminars are supported by introductory lectures (one at the beginning of the course and the others are strategically situated throughout the course), and by the provision of six tutorials. Reading lists are posted using Weblearn. With prior permission, it may also be possible to accommodate a small number of auditors in the undergraduate Copyright, Trade Mark and Patents seminars of Dr. Pila, Dr. Gangjee, and Lord Hoffmann; for permission as regards Copyright and Patents, please write to Dr Pila, and as regards Trade Marks please write to Dr. Gangjee. (MJur students may enrol in an undergraduate IP option provided they are not taking this M Jur course in Intellectual Property Law.)  Note that this course has sometimes previously been called International IP Law, or European IP Law.

The course will be taught by Professor Dinwoodie, Professor Ohly, Dr Gangjee, Dr Hudson, Dr Pila and Ms. Simone in a series of lectures, seminars and tutorials held in Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity Terms.


People

Intellectual Property teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

Justine Pila: University Lecturer in Intellectual Property Law

in conjunction with:

Graeme Dinwoodie: Professor of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law
Dev Gangjee: Associate Professor of Intellectual Property Law
Lord Hoffmann: Visiting Professor
Emily Hudson: CDF in IP Law
Ansgar Ohly: Visiting Professor

Also working in this field, but not involved in its teaching programme:

Peter Hayward: Retired. Formerly Fellow of St Peter's
David Vaver: Emeritus Professor of Intellectual Property & Information Technology Law
Zhao Xiaoping:
Mingchuan Zhou:

Graduate students working in this field:

Quentin Cregan: DPhil Law student
Tom Dysart: DPhil Law student
Poorna Mysoor: DPhil Law student
Luis Henrique Porangaba: MPhil Law student
Daniela Simone: DPhil Law student
Andrea Zappalaglio: DPhil Law student


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