</p><p>Steve Allen</p>

The Master of Philosophy in Law (MPhil) is a research degree available only as an add-on to the taught BCL, MJur and MSc in Law and Finance (MLF) degrees. Admission to the MPhil is conditional upon good performance in the BCL, MJur, or MLF. Students must normally take up their MPhil places straight after the BCL/MJur/MLF although a one-year deferral is sometimes possible. MPhil candidates must write a supervised thesis of up to 30,000 words, as well as completing a course in legal research method. The MPhil is a one-year full-time programme. (Requests for MPhil extensions beyond one calendar year are granted only exceptionally and for at most one term. Candidates who fail to submit their MPhil thesis within one calendar year will normally be transferred to the MSt programme, which allows extra time for submission.)



For those interested in taking their research further, the MPhil year can also double as the first year of the Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) programme. A student studying for a DPhil will spend their first year as a Probationer Research Student before taking the Qualifying Test to become a full DPhil student. However you can apply for admission to the DPhil following the MPhil (you submit a DPhil research proposal together with the MPhil thesis) and if successful, your MPhil year then counts as the first year of the DPhil in place of the Probationer Research Student year and (subject to certain regulations) you can incorporate the MPhil thesis into the final DPhil thesis.