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  • TAO Endicott, 'What Human Rights Are There, if Any, and Why?' (2010) 23 Studies in Christian Ethics 172
    ISBN: 1745-5235
  • L Lazarus, 'Inspecting the Tail of the Dog' in Melissa McCarthy (ed), Incarceration and Human Rights (Manchester University Press 2010)
  • Miles Jackson, Patricia Jimenez Kwast and L Lazarus, Memorandum for Reprieve UK and Clive Stafford Smith on Kiyemba v Obama (Oxford Pro Bono Publico 2009)
    This research concerned the content of the writ of habeus corpus as it existed in the UK in 1789
  • TAO Endicott, 'I diritti umani sono davvero universali? (‘Are human rights really universal?\\\')' in Tecla Mazzarese and Paola Parolari (eds), Diritti fondamentali: le sfide del nuovo millennio (G. Giappichelli Editore, Torino 2009)
    ISBN: 978-88-348-9801-7
  • Jennifer Robinson and L Lazarus, Report for the UN Special Rapporteur on Business and Human Rights - Obstacles for Victims of Corporate Human Rights Violations (Oxford Pro Bono Publico 2008)
    OPBP prepared this submission to inform the mandate of Professor John Ruggie, the Special Representative of the United Nations' Secretary-General on business and human rights. It explores the obstacles victims of corporate human rights abuse face in accessing justice and obtaining remediation through domestic legal systems either in their own countries where the business operations and human rights abuse takes place or in the countries in which the alleged offending transnational corporation is registered or incorporated. It considers these obstacles in relation to 13 specific jurisdictions: Australia, Canada, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the European Union, France, Germany, India, Malaysia, the People's Republic of China, Russia, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States.
  • L Lazarus, 'Report for UN SR on Business and Human Rights - Obstacles to Justice and Redress for Victims of Corporate Human Rights Abuses ' (2008) Oxford Pro Bono Publico
    OPBP prepared this submission under my supervision to inform the mandate of Professor John Ruggie, the Special Representative of the United Nations' Secretary-General on business and human rights. It explores the obstacles victims of corporate human rights abuse face in accessing justice and obtaining remediation through domestic legal systems either in their own countries where the business operations and human rights abuse takes place or in the countries in which the alleged offending transnational corporation is registered or incorporated. It considers these obstacles in relation to 13 specific jurisdictions: Australia, Canada, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the European Union, France, Germany, India, Malaysia, the People's Republic of China, Russia, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States.
  • L Lazarus, 'Civilizing Security by I Loader and N Walker' (2008) Public Law Winter [Review]
  • TAO Endicott, 'Interpretation, Jurisdiction, and the Authority of Law' (2007) 6 American Philosophical Association Newletter 14
    People can be autonomous, if they are subject to authority. In particular, they can be autonomous if they are subject to the authority of law. I defend the first claim through a study of Joseph Raz’s compelling account of authority; I claim that his work leads to the conclusion that autonomous judgment is needed to determine the jurisdiction of an authority, and to interpret its directives. I defend the second claim by arguing (contrary to remarks by Raz) that law does not claim unlimited jurisdiction, and need not claim unlimited scope for its directives. But the requirements of the rule of law create a standing risk that the law will not adequately recognize the autonomy of its subjects, because of its artificial techniques for controlling its own jurisdiction and for controlling the scope of its own directives.
    ISBN: 1067-9464
  • L Lazarus, 'Mapping the Right to Security' in Benjamin J Goold and Liora Lazarus (eds), Security and Human Rights (Hart Publishing 2007)
    ISBN: 978-1-84113-608-0
  • TAO Endicott, 'Adjudication and the Law' (2007) 27 Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 311
    DOI: 10.1093/ojls/gqm007
    ISBN: 1464-3820
  • TAO Endicott, 'The Infant in the Snow' in Timothy Endicott, Joshua Getzler, and Edwin Peel (eds), Properties of Law (Oxford University Press 2006)
    Suppose that you are wandering across the tundra, and you find an infant, all alone, in the snow. She is incapable of discourse, and yet she has the same human rights as anyone who is capable of discourse. Those rights do not depend on the practices or conventions of your people, or hers. Human discourse and human conventions play no role in human rights. I elaborate these claims through a critique of J.W. Harris’'s groundbreaking analytical account of human rights. I conclude that some welfare rights are paradigms of human rights, while rights of freedom of expression, privacy, and assembly, and rights to vote, and rights to independent tribunals are not human rights at all, except in a distantly metaphorical sense. Moreover, human rights can be explained with no reference at all to state authorities (though state authorities may have various special roles in observing and promoting some of them).
    ISBN: 0-19-929096-2
  • Veronika Fikfak and L Lazarus, Legal Research to assist with the drafting of Amendments to the Law on Criminal Procedure of Bosnia-Herzegovina (Oxford Pro Bono Publico 2005)
    This legal research was provided to Judge Malik Hadziomeragic, Judge of the Supreme Court of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and member of Work Group for making a Draft on Amendments to the Law on Criminal Procedure of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Judge Hadziomeragic asked for assistance with several specific research questions about English criminal procedure, as the Work Group is trying to incorporate as much as possible elements of English criminal procedure into its Draft on Amendments.
  • TAO Endicott, 'The Subsidiarity of Law and the Obligation to Obey' (2005) 50 American Journal of Jurisprudence 233
    Law is a morally valuable institution, because every community with a legal system has valuable institutional facilities to coordinate the life of the community in a way that is general and systematic. In every legal system, the value of those facilities yields a moral obligation to obey some laws. But the law’s role in guiding conduct is subsidiary to the responsibility to act with a principled attention to the good of persons, and human law by nature is arbitrary in its application in some cases. The combination of its arbitrariness and its subsidiary role mean that there is no general obligation to obey the law.
    ISBN: 0065-8995
  • TAO Endicott, 'The Value of Vagueness' in Vijay K. Bhatia, Jan Engberg, Maurizio Gotti and Dorothee Heller (eds), Vagueness in Normative Texts (Peter Lang 2005)
    The rule of law requires vague regulation in every legal system. The rule of law stands against arbitrary government and against anarchy, and vague rules are essential techniques to oppose both arbitrary government and anarchy. A general refusal to use vague rules would lead to anarchy because some forms of regulation cannot be performed at all by the use of precise rules. And precision, even when it is possible, can itself lead to arbitrary government.
    ISBN: 3-03910-653-8
  • TAO Endicott and Michael Spence, 'Vagueness in the Scope of Copyright' (2005) 121 Law Quarterly Review 657
    The extravagant vagueness in the scope of copyright protection is not itself a defect in the law. But it gives appellate courts a responsibility to articulate principles to guide decision-makers in resolving copyright disputes. And it gives rise to a special need for an adjudicative process that will serve the purposes of copyright protection.
    ISBN: 0023-933X
  • C O'Regan, '"Breaking Ground: Some thoughts on the seismic shift in our administrative law"' (2004) 121 South African Law Journal 424
    ISBN: 0258-2503
  • C O'Regan, '"The three R's of the Constitution: Responsibility, Respect and Rights"' (2004) Acta Jurídica 86
    ISBN: 07021 6737 1
  • TAO Endicott, Palabras y reglas: Ensayos en filosofía del derecho (Distribuciones Fontamara 2004)
    ‘Words and Rules: Essays in philosophy of law’; a collection of essays translated into Spanish by Pablo Navarro and Rodrigo Sanchez Brígido
    ISBN: 968-476-483-9

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