This project aims to assess the divergent approaches towards the regulation of personal property securities in the two jurisdictions, with a view to seeing what benefits a PPSA-type reform could have for the UK and also what pitfalls are likely in any such reform process. It is funded by an Oxford Law Faculty - Melbourne Law School Research Partnership grant.

The law of personal property security deals broadly with the issue of how lenders and other providers of corporate and consumer credit can protect their claims against borrowers by taking security over the personal property held by borrowers.

Personal property securities reduce the risks associated with providing credit and should therefore contribute to the increased availability of credit. Balanced against this, however, are the legal complexities confronted by lenders when taking security over personal property. This area of law has been the subject of several proposals for reform in both the UK and Australia.

This project aims to assess the divergent approaches towards the regulation of personal property securities in the two jurisdictions, with a view to seeing what benefits a PPSA-type reform could have for the UK and also what pitfalls are likely in any such reform process. This assessment will involve a comparative analysis of selected corporate and consumer financing transactions, an empirical survey of possible difficulties in respect of small-to-medium enterprise financing in the UK and an empirical survey of how the Australian reforms 

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