Dr Mike Macnair is looking for two research assistants to help with work on the ‘substantive criminal law’ chapter of volume IX of the Oxford History of the Laws of England (1689-1760).

Duration and hours

The work is to start immediately and will run during Trinity vacation 2018, and may continue into Michaelmas Term.

The initial budget is for 100 hours of work

You will not be required to work for more than 6 hours in any given week.

It is possible to do the work in a part of the summer vacation – it is not essential to spread it over the entire break.

Reporting

The posts will report to Dr Macnair.

Requirements

A knowledge of English legal history is highly desirable but not absolutely essential.

The assistance is sought for two tasks:

1. skim-reading through the volumes of the Statutes at Large for 1714-1760 to identify statutory provisions amending the criminal law, and where they are found, distinguishing (as well as substantive amendments to existing offences) new capital offences (new exclusions of benefit of clergy), new felonies, new indictable misdemeanours, new summary offences, and new creations of penalties recoverable by civil action as regulatory forms; indexing the results (using Excel or Access).

The assistant for this task will need either existing outline knowledge of criminal law, and a willingness to get rapidly ‘up to speed’ with early modern statutory forms and criminal law; or an existing knowledge of 18th century history, and a willingness to get rapidly ‘up to speed’ with early modern criminal law.

Ability to use Excel or Access will be needed for this post.

2. Running through the Guide to the English Legal Manuscripts microform project to identify manuscript law reports and notebooks of the period 1689-1760, and in particular those which concern criminal matters (“pleas of the Crown”); in consultation with Dr Macnair, selecting the most relevant of these to read through and identify relevant cases, and transcribing these.

The assistant for this task will need either existing outline knowledge of criminal law, and an ability to learn rapidly to read 18th century handwriting and lawyers’ abbreviations, or existing ability to read 18th century English manuscripts and an ability to learn rapidly the relevant criminal law.

Ordinary word-processing skills will be needed for this post.

 

For both posts, knowledge of English history in 1689-1760 may be an advantage.

The first task can be done from online sources, and hence anywhere. The second requires use of microform materials, hence work in substance in the Bodleian.

 

Eligibility

This post is open to graduate research students. Applications are particularly welcomed from those with a background in Law or History. For current Oxford University students, the hours are in line with the restrictions on working hours for students.

Rate of Pay

For work lasting more than 12 weeks: This will be paid at the standard research assistant rate of £14.80/hour plus holiday pay of £2.53 = total of £17.33/hour

Funding

These posts are funded by a research grant from the Australian Research Council.

How to Apply

A short CV and cover letter (including the name of your supervisor, if any) should be sent by email to mike.macnair@law.ox.ac.uk by 10th August 2018. Please explain briefly how you meet the requirements.

Supervisors may be asked for a reference.

Informal enquiries may be emailed to mike.macnair@law.ox.ac.uk

 

Guidelines for Faculty members / line managers

Graduate Studies Committee agreed in Michaelmas Term 2013 the following guidelines and stipulations which were endorsed by the Law Faculty Board the same term.

BCL/MJur students are not permitted to undertake paid work of any kind for the Faculty, and are advised against undertaking paid work offered from any other source as well.

PRS, MPhil, and MSt students are not permitted to undertake teaching for the Faculty but can undertake up to eight hours’ paid work per week and can be employed by the Faculty up to that limit for work other than teaching.

DPhil students can undertake up to eight hours’ paid work of any kind (including teaching) per week and can be employed by the Faculty up to that limit.

Any queries regarding the eligibility of a particular student should be directed to Geraldine Malloy in the Faculty Office.