Contact

Address

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

Manor Road,
Oxford
OX1 3UQ

Other affiliations

Phone

01865 284230

Biography

 

Dr Dvora Liberman joined the Oxford Centre for Socio-Legal Studies in 2019 as a Postdoctoral Researcher before becoming a Programme Associate in December 2020. She was previously a Research Fellow at the London School of Economics Law Department, after completing her PhD in partnership with LSE's Legal Biography Project and National Life Stories, British Library. Dvora is an oral historian and arts practitioner, and has developed numerous oral history and participatory arts projects with government departments, charities and cultural institutions in the UK, India, Australia, Bosnia, Israel and Palestine. She has shared the life stories of marginalised and unheard communities with a wide variety of audiences through theatre, film, books and exhibitions. Dvora holds an MA in Oral History and Documentary Filmmaking from the University of Sussex, and a Bachelor of Teaching from the University of Melbourne. 

Publications

Recent additions

  • D Liberman, 'Interpreting inconsistencies and finding meaning in Crown Court clerks’ life story narratives' (2020) 48 Oral History 80
    This article is an enquiry into a distinct pattern of inconsistencies I observed within the life-story narratives of Crown Court clerks. These discrepancies relate specifically to the contrary ways in which the majority of interviewees spoke about the emotional demands and impact of their work at different points in their interviews. In order to understand what this pattern means and why it manifested in interviewees’ accounts, I draw on the theoretical frameworks of emotional labour and habitus from sociology, as well as key concepts from oral history literature, namely, composure, reflexivity and intersubjectivity. I argue that analysing the incongruities in court clerks’ memory-stories yields significant insight into their social and cultural worlds, as well as into the interview process and relationship. Author(s): Dvora Liberman Keywords: emotional labour; habitus; composure; reflexivity; intersubjectivity
  • D Liberman, 'Custodians of Continuity in an era of change: An oral history of the everyday lives of Crown Court clerks' (2018) 18 Legal Information Management 120
    This article discusses an oral history doctoral research project about the little known, yet critical role of the court clerk in Crown Courts. It is surprising that even though Crown Court clerks have been pivotal in trials of the most serious criminal offences, they have been neglected in legal scholarship. This research project has contributed towards filling an absence in the academic literature about the nature and function of their vital work between 1972 and 2015, and was carried out by Dvora Liberman, in partnership with the London School of Economics Legal Biography Project and National Life Stories, British Library.

Journal Article (2)

D Liberman, 'Interpreting inconsistencies and finding meaning in Crown Court clerks’ life story narratives' (2020) 48 Oral History 80
This article is an enquiry into a distinct pattern of inconsistencies I observed within the life-story narratives of Crown Court clerks. These discrepancies relate specifically to the contrary ways in which the majority of interviewees spoke about the emotional demands and impact of their work at different points in their interviews. In order to understand what this pattern means and why it manifested in interviewees’ accounts, I draw on the theoretical frameworks of emotional labour and habitus from sociology, as well as key concepts from oral history literature, namely, composure, reflexivity and intersubjectivity. I argue that analysing the incongruities in court clerks’ memory-stories yields significant insight into their social and cultural worlds, as well as into the interview process and relationship. Author(s): Dvora Liberman Keywords: emotional labour; habitus; composure; reflexivity; intersubjectivity
D Liberman, 'Custodians of Continuity in an era of change: An oral history of the everyday lives of Crown Court clerks' (2018) 18 Legal Information Management 120
This article discusses an oral history doctoral research project about the little known, yet critical role of the court clerk in Crown Courts. It is surprising that even though Crown Court clerks have been pivotal in trials of the most serious criminal offences, they have been neglected in legal scholarship. This research project has contributed towards filling an absence in the academic literature about the nature and function of their vital work between 1972 and 2015, and was carried out by Dvora Liberman, in partnership with the London School of Economics Legal Biography Project and National Life Stories, British Library.

Research projects

Research Interests

Equality and diversity in the legal professions, feminist socio-legal studies, oral history, life writing

Research projects