Biography

Kate is Director of the University’s Diplomatic Studies Programme.  Her interests lie in diplomacy, public international law and human rights law. Her research and publications focus on human rights law and online political discourse, counter-terrorism, human rights and sanctions law.

Kate’s background is as a diplomat and lawyer with the legal cadre of the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office.  At the FCO she advised the British Government on, among other topics, human rights law, humanitarian law, diplomatic law, the law on counter-terrorism, and the law relating to the British Overseas Territories.  She was Legal Adviser to the United Kingdom’s Mission to the United Nations in Geneva and the United Kingdom’s Deputy Permanent Representative to the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, where her human rights and legal affairs portfolio included acting as UK negotiator of the Brighton Declaration on reform of the European Court of Human Rights.  She originally qualified as a commercial litigation solicitor in the City of London, and after qualification spent several months as a judicial assistant in the Court of Appeal of England and Wales.

Kate is a fellow of Kellogg College and an Associate of the Oxford Human Rights Hub.  She completed both her undergraduate and her postgraduate studies in law at Somerville College, and was formerly a member of the Senior Common Room at St Antony’s.

Publications

Recent additions

  • K Jones, 'Protecting political discourse from online manipulation: the international human rights law framework' (2021) European Human Rights Law Review 68
    Diverse forms of online interference in political debate can be grouped together as manipulation, which poses a significant threat to our democracies, whether conducted by foreign or domestic actors. This article argues that both states and internet platforms should respond to this threat, and their responses should be guided by international human rights law. It draws on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to explain how international human rights law places obligations on states and responsibilities on corporate actors. It explains how both foreign and domestic state actors have obligations not to engage in manipulation themselves and to protect their populations from human rights abuses that manipulation may cause. It discusses internet platforms’ responsibilities to respect human rights. It then discusses briefly the substance of the principal human rights that may be infringed or engaged by online manipulation of political debate: the right to participate in public affairs and to vote, the freedoms of thought and of opinion, the right to privacy and freedom of expression. It concludes that both states and platforms should tackle online manipulation by taking steps to protect human rights, while avoiding blunt responses that themselves infringe human rights.
    ISBN: ISSN 1361-1526

Journal Article (2)

K Jones, 'Protecting political discourse from online manipulation: the international human rights law framework' (2021) European Human Rights Law Review 68
Diverse forms of online interference in political debate can be grouped together as manipulation, which poses a significant threat to our democracies, whether conducted by foreign or domestic actors. This article argues that both states and internet platforms should respond to this threat, and their responses should be guided by international human rights law. It draws on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to explain how international human rights law places obligations on states and responsibilities on corporate actors. It explains how both foreign and domestic state actors have obligations not to engage in manipulation themselves and to protect their populations from human rights abuses that manipulation may cause. It discusses internet platforms’ responsibilities to respect human rights. It then discusses briefly the substance of the principal human rights that may be infringed or engaged by online manipulation of political debate: the right to participate in public affairs and to vote, the freedoms of thought and of opinion, the right to privacy and freedom of expression. It concludes that both states and platforms should tackle online manipulation by taking steps to protect human rights, while avoiding blunt responses that themselves infringe human rights.
ISBN: ISSN 1361-1526

Report (1)

Other (1)

Chapter (2)

Research Interests

Law and diplomacy; human rights law; law of armed conflict; diplomacy

Options taught

Public International Law, International Law and Armed Conflict

Research projects