Biography

Ryan is a Research Fellow within the Centre for Criminology, working on an ESRC-funded study 'Place, crime and insecurity in everyday life: A contemporary study of an English town' with a team of researchers from Oxford, Keele, Edinburgh, and UCL. This project is an ethnography of place and everyday in/security, exploring how people in the English town of Macclesfield talk about and act towards a range of threats that they regard as impinging upon their safety and security. More information on the study can be found on the project website.

Ryan is also a Research Associate working on a partnership project between the Crichton Trust and University of Glasgow about co-creating 'connected homes' with households to support wellbeing in a rural location. This project is funded by Research England's Connecting Capability Fund and seeks to investigate the ways in which digital connectivity, data-driven services, and home life are interconnected in rural areas.

Ryan recently completed her PhD in Criminology at the University of Glasgow and Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research. Her doctoral research, funded by the College of Social Science, ethnographically explores penal electronic monitoring as a 'technosocial' surveillance network (more information here). Her work draws upon both the sociology of punishment and STS in order to better understand how digital technology mediates punishment. During her doctoral studies, Ryan was also a Graduate Teaching Assistant in Qualitative Research Methods and Research Assistant on the Scotland in Lockdown rapid research project which explored the impacts of Covid-19 on marginalised groups in Scotland including people under criminal justice control. 

Publications

Recent additions

  • R. Casey, F. McNeill, B. Barkas and N. Cornish, 'Pervasive punishment in a pandemic' (2021) Probation Journal (forthcoming)
  • R. Casey, Capacities and demands in times of crisis: Impacts of the pandemic on third sector service provision (Scotland in Lockdown 2020)
    Organisations have had to make changes to the work they do and how they do it in order to continue supporting marginalised populations during the Covid-19 pandemic. This briefing draws upon the Scotland in Lockdown study’s organisational survey data in order to better understand the staff experiences of how organisations have been impacted. Many services were suspended as a result of lockdown measures and as support becomes remote and moves online, this raises concerns about how it impacts relationships not just between staff and service users, but between community organisations and communities at large. Some services have seen significant spikes in demand and the brunt of meeting these demands appears to fall unequally on smaller organisations that have fewer resources but refuse to turn anyone away.

Internet Publication (2)

Journal Article (1)

R. Casey, F. McNeill, B. Barkas and N. Cornish, 'Pervasive punishment in a pandemic' (2021) Probation Journal (forthcoming)

Report (1)

R. Casey, Capacities and demands in times of crisis: Impacts of the pandemic on third sector service provision (Scotland in Lockdown 2020)
Organisations have had to make changes to the work they do and how they do it in order to continue supporting marginalised populations during the Covid-19 pandemic. This briefing draws upon the Scotland in Lockdown study’s organisational survey data in order to better understand the staff experiences of how organisations have been impacted. Many services were suspended as a result of lockdown measures and as support becomes remote and moves online, this raises concerns about how it impacts relationships not just between staff and service users, but between community organisations and communities at large. Some services have seen significant spikes in demand and the brunt of meeting these demands appears to fall unequally on smaller organisations that have fewer resources but refuse to turn anyone away.

Research projects