My research examines the relationship between the immigration law and migrants. This investigation is sociological, conceptualising migrants as agents responding to the new socio-legal environment. The main research questions I pursue comparatively across different legal contexts are: How do migrants experience, understand and relate to immigration law in different legal contexts? What are the wider social impacts of the changes in immigration law and policy, as confronted by migrants and legal professionals in the field?

Migration is not a crime- Banksy

Paddington Bear by Banksy.

Agnieszka studied empirically the immigration law and its enforcement in the United Kingdom since 2004. She conducted research on Eastern European migrants’ experiences of the transition period – when EU law on free movement has not yet been fully implemented – immediately upon the 2004 Enlargement of the European Union. This research has been published as a monograph with Ashgate/ Routledge in 2012 under the title: Socio-Legal Integration. Polish post-2004 EU Enlargement Migrants in the United Kingdom.

Later on she was part of a THEMIS project - Theorizing the Evolution of European Migration Systems - at International Migration Institute. This large, multi-partner project collected empirical data with migrants (from Morocco, Brazil and Ukraine) in different member states of the European Union: Norway, the UK, the Netherlands and Portugal, focusing on the different dynamics of migratory processes. Agnieszka's research centred on migrants' experiences of the legal system in the different EU countries, law enforcement, human rights, legality, selective criminalization of immigration law, and legal consciousness.

refugees_2.jpg

Ahead of refugee case hearing in Moscow court.

Currently Agnieszka’s project generously funded by the British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellowship examines the case of Russia, the second largest destination for migrants globally, aiming at developing an approach to study the global socio-legal dimensions of migrations that move beyond the European and American experiences.

Publications