The Human Rights for Future Generations (HRFG) is an interdisciplinary research programme funded by the Oxford Martin School. The Programme is directed by Sandy Fredman and Dapo Akande (both from the Faculty of Law) and Simon Caney (Department of Politics and International Relations). It aims to contribute to academic and policy thinking on the human rights dimensions surrounding 21st Century issues such as poverty, armed conflict and environmental change. Drawing on the disciplines of law, philosophy, politics and international relations, the HRFG programme is co-directed by Liora Lazarus (Faculty of Law), Hilary Greaves (Faculty of Philosophy) and Jennifer Welsh (Department of Politics and International Relations). 

The HRFG Programme investigates the existing normative, legal and institutional human rights framework to face these challenges. This project aims to advance a new framework built on ethical, legal and political dimensions that will help translate theory into real legal and policy solutions on these issues. It also aims at leading and promoting high level research in the different areas related to human rights and intends to contribute to a better understanding of the contemporary challenges facing armed conflict, poverty and climate change. Challenges such as poverty, environmental change and armed conflict require international cooperation on an unprecedented scale. Yet there are serious questions regarding the adequacy of existing frameworks to face these challenges. The programme aims to advance a new framework built on ethical, legal and political dimensions that will help translate theory into real legal and policy solutions on these issues.

The ultimate objective is to engage in in-depth reflection, based on scientific methods, in domains that are constantly evolving in response to current events and are subject to the political pressures. The programme seeks to cross boundaries, not just disciplinary but also among different stakeholders, by facilitating a dialogue between academics and those who are more practically and politically engaged. Research projects undertaken may be of a short, medium or long-term nature; be in partnership with other international and/or national organisations; as well as multidisciplinary in their approach. These projects are aimed at any government, organisation or person interested in the different domains of expertise at the HRFG.

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