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Law of Obligations — Overview

This theme contains three subjects, namely: Contract, Restitution and Tort


Contract

Discussion Groups

These self-sustaining groups are an essential part of the life of our graduate school. They are organised in some cases by graduate students and in others by Faculty members and meet regularly during term, typically over a sandwich lunch, when one of the group presents work in progress or introduces a discussion of a particular issue or new case. They may also encompass guest speakers from the faculty and beyond.

Obligations Discussion Group

Publications

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Showing key publications in this field, as selected by the author
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Show All 104 | Recent publications

2013

W E Peel, 'The Termination Paradox' (2013) Lloyds Maritime & Commercial Law Quarterly 519 [...]

An article dealing with the circumstances in which termination for breach of contract pursuant to the express provisions of the contract may prevent submission that the contract was terminated for repudiatory breach, analysing the basis for such a finding (which appears to lie in affrmation), its consequences, and potential solutions for parties wishing to retain the right to sue for repudiatory breach


ISBN: 0306-2945

2012

Simon Whittaker, 'The Proposed \'Common European Sales Law\': Legal Framework and the Agreement of the Parties' (2012) 75 Modern Law Review 578 [...]

The European Commission’s Proposal for a Regulation on a Common European Sales Law (‘CESL’) seeks to create a European scheme of contract law available for parties to choose to govern cross-border contracts for the sale of goods, supply of ‘digital content,’ and for the supply of related services.This article explains the background to the Proposal, sketches out the purposes and scope of the CESL, and considers and criticises its legal framework (and in particular its relationship with private international law) and the key requirement of the parties’ agreement. In the author’s view, the CESL scheme remains an unconvincing basis for the achievement of its economic purposes and, as regards consumer contracts, puts too much reliance on the agreement of the consumer as a justification for the loss of their existing protection under EU private international law rules.


T Krebs, 'Yearworth and the Law of Contract' (2012) Journal of Medical Ethics Special Issue - Human Body Parts/Property

2011

W E Peel, 'The Common Law Tradition: Regulation of Boilerplate Clauses in English Law' in G. Cordero-Moss (ed), Boilerplate Clauses, International Commercial Contracts and the Applicable Law (CUP 2011)

W E Peel, Treitel: The Law of Contract, 13th ed. (Sweet & Maxwell 2011)

2010

M Chen-Wishart, 'A Bird in the Hand: Consideration and One-Sided Contract Modifications' in AS Burrows, E Peel (eds), Contract Formation and Parties (Oxford University Press 2010) [...]

If we accept that a bird in the hand is the worth two in the bush then the idea that the receipt of performance (even part performance) confers a benefit over and above the right to performance, and can be exchanged for something from the recipient, is consistent with the core idea of the consideration doctrine. All that remains is to replace the bilateral contract analysis in Williams v Roffey with a unilateral contract analysis (the promisor is only bound if the stipulated performance is actually received). This is preferable to three recently mooted alternatives to consideration as the primary test of enforceability: (i) the test of serious intention subject to contrary policies advanced in Antons Trawling v Smith; (ii) the version of promissory estoppel advanced in Collier v Wright, and (iii) leaving it all to the vitiating factors advocated in Gay Choon Ing v Loh Sze Ti Terence Peter.


ISBN: 9780199583706

W E Peel, 'Agreements to Negotiate in Good Faith' in Andrew Burrows and Edwin Peel (eds), Contract Formation and Parties (OUP 2010) [...]

An essay concerning the limits to the enforceability of agreements to negotiate and a proposal for reform


ISBN: 978-0-19-958370-6

J Cartwright, 'Liability in Tort for Pre-Contractual Non-Disclosure' in A Burrows and E Peel (eds), Contract Formation and Parties (OUP 2010) [...]

Discussion and criticism of recent cases holdinbg that a fraudulent breach of a duty of disclosure is actionable within the tort of deceit.


ISBN: 9780199583706

2009

J Cartwright, 'The English Law of Contract: Time for Review?' (2009) 17 European Review of Private Law 155 [...]

Discussion of aspects of the English law of contract which are in need of reform, and the mechanisms by which reform can be achieved. Revised text of Inaugural Lecture delivered on 7 October 2008 in acceptance of the Chair of Anglo-American Private Law at the University of Leiden.


ISBN: 0928-9801

Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Undergraduate

FHS (Phase II)

The degree is awarded on the basis of nine final examinations at the end of the three-year course (or four years in the case of Law with Law Studies in Europe) and (for students who began the course in October 2011 or later) an essay in Jurisprudence written over the summer vacation at the end of the second year. Note: the Jurisprudence exam at the end of the third year is correspondingly shorter. This phase of the Final Honour School includes the third term of the first year, and all three terms of the second year.

Contract

The syllabus comprises the general principles of the law governing enforceable agreements. It is not concerned with special rules governing specific types of contracts, such as sale, carriage or employment. The principal topics normally discussed are: (a) the rules relating to the formation of agreements and to certain further requirements which must be satisfied to make agreements legally enforceable; (b) the contents of a contract and the rules governing the validity of terms which exclude or restrict liability; (c) the nature and effects in a contractual context of mistake, misrepresentation, duress and undue influence; (d) the general principle that right and duties arising under a contract can only be enforced by and against the parties to it; (e) performance and breach, including the right to terminate for failure in performance and the effects of wrongful repudiation; (f) supervening events as a ground of discharge under the doctrine of frustration; (g) remedies for breach of contract by way of damages, action for the agreed sum, specific performance and injunction. (h) the basis of contractual liability.

Contract is one of the compulsory standard subjects within the Final Honour School syllabus. It also covers material in the “foundations of legal knowledge” and so must be taken by those seeking a professional qualification in England and Wales.

The subject is taught in tutorials arranged by your college tutor. Particular areas are also explored in lectures.

Diploma in Legal Studies

Contract

The syllabus comprises the general principles of the law governing enforceable agreements. It is not concerned with special rules governing specific types of contracts, such as sale, carriage or employment. The principal topics normally discussed are: (a) the rules relating to the formation of agreements and to certain further requirements which must be satisfied to make agreements legally enforceable; (b) the contents of a contract and the rules governing the validity of terms which exclude or restrict liability; (c) the nature and effects in a contractual context of mistake, misrepresentation, duress and undue influence; (d) the general principle that right and duties arising under a contract can only be enforced by and against the parties to it; (e) performance and breach, including the right to terminate for failure in performance and the effects of wrongful repudiation; (f) supervening events as a ground of discharge under the doctrine of frustration; (g) remedies for breach of contract by way of damages, action for the agreed sum, specific performance and injunction. (h) the basis of contractual liability.

Contract is one of the compulsory standard subjects within the Final Honour School syllabus. It also covers material in the “foundations of legal knowledge” and so must be taken by those seeking a professional qualification in England and Wales.

The subject is taught in tutorials arranged by your college tutor. Particular areas are also explored in lectures.

Postgraduate

MJur

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from civil law backgrounds.

Contract (also part of the BA course)

The syllabus comprises the general principles of the law governing enforceable agreements. It is not concerned with special rules governing specific types of contracts, such as sale, carriage or employment. The principal topics normally discussed are: (a) the rules relating to the formation of agreements and to certain further requirements which must be satisfied to make agreements legally enforceable; (b) the contents of a contract and the rules governing the validity of terms which exclude or restrict liability; (c) the nature and effects in a contractual context of mistake, misrepresentation, duress and undue influence; (d) the general principle that right and duties arising under a contract can only be enforced by and against the parties to it; (e) performance and breach, including the right to terminate for failure in performance and the effects of wrongful repudiation; (f) supervening events as a ground of discharge under the doctrine of frustration; (g) remedies for breach of contract by way of damages, action for the agreed sum, specific performance and injunction. (h) the basis of contractual liability.

Contract is one of the compulsory standard subjects within the Final Honour School syllabus. It also covers material in the “foundations of legal knowledge” and so must be taken by those seeking a professional qualification in England and Wales.

The subject is taught in tutorials arranged by your college tutor. Particular areas are also explored in lectures.


People

Contract teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

Mindy Chen-Wishart: Reader in Contract Law

in conjunction with:

Dapo Akande: Associate Professor of Public International Law
Alexandra Braun: Associate Professor of Law
Adrian Briggs: Professor of Private International Law
Susan Bright: Professor of Land Law, McGregor Fellow
Andrew Burrows, QC: Professor of the Law of England
John Cartwright: Professor of the Law of Contract
Hugh Collins: Vinerian Professor
Paul S Davies: Associate Professor of Law
Andrew Dyson: College Lecturer and Tutor in Law
Stefan Enchelmaier: Professor of European and Comparative Law
Dev Gangjee: Associate Professor of Intellectual Property Law
Joshua Getzler: Professor of Law and Legal History
Sarah Green: Associate Professor of Law
Katharine Grevling: Associate Professor of Law
Louise Gullifer: Professor of Commercial Law
Jonathan Herring: Professor of Law
Andrew Higgins: Lecturer in Civil Procedure
Thomas Krebs: Associate Professor of Commercial Law
Ewan McKendrick: Registrar
Peter Mirfield: CUF Lecturer
Donal Nolan: Associate Professor of Law
Edwin Peel: Professor of Law
Simon Whittaker: Professor of European Comparative Law

assisted by:

Carmine Conte: DPhil Law student
Quentin Cregan: DPhil Law student
Jesse Wall: DPhil Law student

Also working in this field, but not involved in its teaching programme:

Iris Benöhr: British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow
Rong Chen: Law Department of East China Normal University
Tatiana Cutts: DPhil Law student
Olumide Famuyiwa: DPhil Law student
Jodi Gardner: DPhil Law student
Donald Harris: Retired. Formerly Director of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies at Balliol
Geneviève Helleringer:
Dori Kimel: Reader in Legal Philosophy
Rodrigo Momberg Uribe: Career Development Fellow in Comparative Law
Natalie Mrockova: DPhil Law student
Aleksi Ollikainen: MPhil Law student
Andelka Phillips: DPhil Law student
Dan Prentice: Emeritus Professor of Corporate Law
Francis Reynolds: Emeritus Professor of Law at Worcester College
Guenter Treitel: Emeritus Vinerian Professor of English Law at All Souls

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Restitution

Publications

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Show All 26 | Recent publications

2013

R Williams, 'Overpaid Taxes: A Hybrid Public and Private Approach' in Birke Haecker, Charles Mitchell, Steven Elliott (eds), Restitution of Overpaid Tax ( 2013) [...]

Continues the argument developed in 'Unjust Enrichment and Public law' in the light of the decision of the Supreme Court in FII. Argues that in Deutsche Morgan Grenfell the House of Lords took a wrong turning on the law of unjust enrichment in a public law context, a decision which has led to unnecessary and avoidable litigation, as evidenced by FII. Suggests that such litigation could in future be avoided by reversing the Deutsche Morgan Grenfell decision and adopting the hybrid public and private approach to cases of unjust enrichment involving public bodies.


ISBN: 9781849461733

2010

R Williams, Unjust Enrichment and Public Law: A comparative study of England, France and the EU (Hart Publishing 2010) [...]

Since the decisions in R v IRC ex p Woolwich Equitable Building Society in 1990 and Hazell v Hammersmith and Fulham LBC in 1991, the courts have had, in a variety of contexts, to grapple with the relationship between unjust enrichment, public law and the law of the European Community. 20 years later, the decision of the European Court of Justice in Metallgesellschaft and Hoecsht v IRC in 2001 has led to a further explosion of such cases, many of which are still making their way through the courts. The central aim of this book is to examine such claims in France, England and the EC. The author argues that so far these cases have been viewed from either a public or private law perspective, whereas in fact both branches of the law are relevant, and the courts ought not to lose sight of the public law issues when a claim is brought under the private law of unjust enrichment. Support for this position is drawn from an examination of French law, which demonstrates that neither adoption of the ‘without cause’ approach to unjust enrichment, nor the longer-standing existence of a separate concept of public law removes the necessity for such a hybrid public and private understanding of the cases. Finally, in order to complete the picture the book examines cases where the limit on the public body’s powers derives, not from domestic public law, but from the law of the EC. Thus a further aspect of the book is that it analyses more specifically what is often referred to as the ECJ’s ‘remedies’ jurisprudence in order to investigate the division of labour between the European courts and the domestic courts in defining such claims.


ISBN: 1841134147 / 9781841

Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Postgraduate

BCL

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from common-law backgrounds

Restitution of Unjust Enrichment

Restitution of Unjust Enrichment is concerned with about how and when a claimant can compel a defendant to surrender an enrichment gained at the claimant’s expense. Long neglected, the subject has in recent years been one of the most exciting in the postgraduate curriculum. It draws its cases from areas of the law which have resisted rational analysis, largely because they have tenaciously preserved the language of an earlier age.

Common lawyers found themselves unable to escape from money had and received, money paid, and quantum meruit, while those on the chancery side became defensively fond of the unsolved mysteries of tracing and trusts arising by operation of law. In the result, down to earth questions about getting back money and value in other forms have been made to seem much more difficult than they need be. The aim of any course on restitution must be to try to understand what has really been going on and to play back that understanding to the courts in accessible modern language. These aims are helped by keeping an eye on the main lines of civilian solutions to the problems with which the common law has to wrestle.

Note that this course is concerned only with restitution of unjust enrichment. Restitution for wrongs is not part of the course and is dealt with in the Commercial remedies course.

Teaching is through twelve seminars. The seminars are supported by two introductory lectures and by the provision of four tutorials. A detailed account of the course is produced every year in and posted on this site. The subject of every seminar is set out, with a list of cases and other materials to be read, together with questions and problems intended to stimulate thought.

MJur

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from civil law backgrounds.

Restitution of Unjust Enrichment

Restitution of Unjust Enrichment is concerned with about how and when a claimant can compel a defendant to surrender an enrichment gained at the claimant’s expense. Long neglected, the subject has in recent years been one of the most exciting in the postgraduate curriculum. It draws its cases from areas of the law which have resisted rational analysis, largely because they have tenaciously preserved the language of an earlier age.

Common lawyers found themselves unable to escape from money had and received, money paid, and quantum meruit, while those on the chancery side became defensively fond of the unsolved mysteries of tracing and trusts arising by operation of law. In the result, down to earth questions about getting back money and value in other forms have been made to seem much more difficult than they need be. The aim of any course on restitution must be to try to understand what has really been going on and to play back that understanding to the courts in accessible modern language. These aims are helped by keeping an eye on the main lines of civilian solutions to the problems with which the common law has to wrestle.

Note that this course is concerned only with restitution of unjust enrichment. Restitution for wrongs is not part of the course and is dealt with in the Commercial remedies course.

Teaching is through twelve seminars. The seminars are supported by two introductory lectures and by the provision of four tutorials. A detailed account of the course is produced every year in and posted on this site. The subject of every seminar is set out, with a list of cases and other materials to be read, together with questions and problems intended to stimulate thought.


People

Restitution teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

William Swadling: Reader in Property Law

in conjunction with:

Andrew Burrows, QC: Professor of the Law of England
Mindy Chen-Wishart: Reader in Contract Law
Paul S Davies: Associate Professor of Law
Ewan McKendrick: Registrar
Edwin Peel: Professor of Law
Robert Stevens: Herbert Smith Freehills Professor of English Private Law
Simon Whittaker: Professor of European Comparative Law

Also working in this field, but not involved in its teaching programme:

Tatiana Cutts: DPhil Law student
Derek Davies: Retired. Formerly Fellow and Tutor in Law at St Catherine's
Jodi Gardner: DPhil Law student
Krishnaprasad Kizhakkevalappil: MPhil Law student
Weeliem Seah: DPhil Law student

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Tort

Forthcoming Subject Events


April 2014

Oxford Law Faculty
The Jurisprudence of Lord Hoffmann
Oxford Law Faculty The Cube

Publications

Showing selected publications sorted by year, then title  [change this]

Showing key publications in this field, as selected by the author
Change to sort them by title | name | type OR
Show All 91 | Recent publications

2013

D P Nolan, 'Deconstructing the Duty of Care' (2013) 129 Law Quarterly Review 559

D P Nolan, 'Negligence and Human Rights: The Case for Separate Development' (2013) 76 Modern Law Review 286

R M Bagshaw, 'The Animals Act 1971' in TT Arvind and Jenny Steele (eds), Tort Law and the Legislature (Hart Publishing 2013) [...]

Account of the process that led to the passing of the Animals Act 1971 and its subsequent interpretation.


ISBN: 9781849461405

2012

N J McBride and R M Bagshaw, Tort Law (Fourth edition) (Pearson 2012) [...]

Fourth edition of this textbook


ISBN: 9781408252703

D P Nolan, '\"A Tort Against Land\": Private Nuisance as a Property Tort' in D Nolan and A Robertson (eds), Rights and Private Law (Hart Publishing 2012)

2011

R M Bagshaw, 'Causing the Behaviour of Others and Other Causal Mixtures' in Richard Goldberg (ed), Perspectives on Causation (Hart Publishing 2011) [...]

This chapter investigates the concept of ‘cause’ which ought to be used by tort lawyers when making claims such as that Derek’s wrongful behaviour ‘caused’ Trevor to act in some way, in particular in circumstances where we regard Trevor’s action as ‘voluntary’ rather than ‘coerced’. The central issue is whether a tort lawyer’s inquiry into whether Derek’s wrongful behaviour ‘caused’ Trevor to act in some way ought to be the same as an inquiry into whether Derek’s wrongful behaviour ‘caused’ the kettle to boil or the toaster to burn the toast.


ISBN: 9781849460866

R M Bagshaw, 'The Edges of Tort Law’s Rights' in D Nolan and A Robertson (eds), Rights and Private Law (Hart Publishing 2011) [...]

Most proponents of a ‘rights-focused account’ of the law of torts argue that not only are there currently no general common law rights to pure economic benefits but there are also good reasons why general common law rights to purely economic benefits should not exist whilst general common law rights to property do, or good reasons why legislators or judges should not in future create or recognise general common law rights to purely economic benefits. The main purpose of this chapter is to evaluate these ‘good reasons’ using three perspectives provided by the ‘edges’ of currently recognised legal rights.


ISBN: 9781849461429

D P Nolan, 'The Liability of Public Authorities for Failing to Confer Benefits' (2011) 127 Law Quarterly Review 260

R M Bagshaw, 'Tort Design and Human Rights Thinking' in David Hoffman (ed), The Impact of the UK Human Rights Act on Private Law (Cambridge University Press 2011) [...]

The principal theme of this chapter is that in pursuing the goal of making English tort law compatible with Convention rights, and the related goal of developing tort law so as to allow it to assist in protecting these rights, we should not lose sight of what makes a good tort duty. Lord Bingham commended the opinion that ‘where a common law duty covers the same ground as a Convention right, it should, so far as practicable, develop in harmony with it’ (Van Colle v. Chief Constable of the Hertfordshire Police; Smith v. Chief Constable of Sussex Police [2008] UKHL 50; [2009] 1 AC 225 at [58]). But this chapter aims to unsettle any assumption that such harmony requires the development of tort duties which mirror Convention rights, even in situations where the tort duties will be owed by public bodies. It is more important for newly developed duties to be harmonious with the goals of the law of torts than for them to replicate concepts used by the Strasbourg Court.


ISBN: 9781107009325

2010

Laura Hoyano and C Keenan, Child Abuse: Law and Policy Across Boundaries (OUP 2010) [...]

This book examines the whole process of child protection from complaint investigation to prosecution in the criminal and civil courts. It provides a coherent analysis of current law and procedure across the legal and geographical boundaries within which legal discussion of child abuse is usually confined, analysing criminal, family, tort, human rights and evidence law as they bear on child abuse cases. Comparative material is drawn from over 75 jurisdictionsusing the adversarial trial model. The book was awarded the first Inner Temple Book Prize (2008). The paperback edition is updated in English law, including the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 enacted on 12 November 2009.


ISBN: 978-0-19-957156-7

2009

R M Bagshaw, 'Tort Law, Concepts and What Really Matters' in Andrew Robertson and Tang Hang Wu (eds), The Goals of Private Law (Hart Publishing 2009) [...]

This chapter explores the relationship between the capacity of tort law to achieve its goals and the nature of the concepts that are incorporated in the law.


ISBN: 9781841139098

Courses

The courses we offer in this field are:

Undergraduate

FHS (Phase II)

The degree is awarded on the basis of nine final examinations at the end of the three-year course (or four years in the case of Law with Law Studies in Europe) and (for students who began the course in October 2011 or later) an essay in Jurisprudence written over the summer vacation at the end of the second year. Note: the Jurisprudence exam at the end of the third year is correspondingly shorter. This phase of the Final Honour School includes the third term of the first year, and all three terms of the second year.

Tort

Tort is one of the compulsory standard subjects within the Final Honour School syllabus. It also covers material in the “foundations of legal knowledge” and so must be taken by those seeking a professional qualification in England and Wales. The law of tort is mainly concerned with providing compensation for personal injury and damage to property, but also protects other interests, such as reputation, personal freedom, title to property, enjoyment of property, and commercial interests.The subject is taught in tutorials arranged by your college tutor. Lectures in Michaelmas and Trinity terms cover most, but not all, of the topics on the agreed reading list. Revision lectures on contract and tort take place in Hilary term.

Diploma in Legal Studies

Tort

Tort is one of the compulsory standard subjects within the Final Honour School syllabus. It also covers material in the “foundations of legal knowledge” and so must be taken by those seeking a professional qualification in England and Wales. The law of tort is mainly concerned with providing compensation for personal injury and damage to property, but also protects other interests, such as reputation, personal freedom, title to property, enjoyment of property, and commercial interests.The subject is taught in tutorials arranged by your college tutor. Lectures in Michaelmas and Trinity terms cover most, but not all, of the topics on the agreed reading list. Revision lectures on contract and tort take place in Hilary term.

Postgraduate

MJur

Our taught postgraduate programme, designed to serve outstanding law students from civil law backgrounds.

Tort (also part of the BA course)

Tort is one of the compulsory standard subjects within the Final Honour School syllabus. It also covers material in the “foundations of legal knowledge” and so must be taken by those seeking a professional qualification in England and Wales. The law of tort is mainly concerned with providing compensation for personal injury and damage to property, but also protects other interests, such as reputation, personal freedom, title to property, enjoyment of property, and commercial interests.The subject is taught in tutorials arranged by your college tutor. Lectures in Michaelmas and Trinity terms cover most, but not all, of the topics on the agreed reading list. Revision lectures on contract and tort take place in Hilary term.


People

Tort teaching is organized by a Subject Group convened by:

James Goudkamp: Associate Professor of Law

in conjunction with:

Roderick Bagshaw: Associate Professor of Law
Andrew Burrows, QC: Professor of the Law of England
John Cartwright: Professor of the Law of Contract
Andrew Dickinson: Fellow and Tutor, St Catherine's College
Professor of Law
Andrew Dyson: College Lecturer and Tutor in Law
Lucinda Ferguson: Associate Professor of Family Law
Dev Gangjee: Associate Professor of Intellectual Property Law
Rob George: British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow
Imogen Goold: Associate Professor of Law
Sarah Green: Associate Professor of Law
Noam Gur: Shaw Foundation Fellow in Law, Lincoln College
Andrew Higgins: Lecturer in Civil Procedure
Laura Hoyano: Associate Professor of Law, Faculty of Law, and Senior Research Fellow in Law at Wadham College
Thomas Krebs: Associate Professor of Commercial Law
Dorota Leczykiewicz: Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow
Mike Macnair: Associate Professor of Law
Donal Nolan: Associate Professor of Law
Edwin Peel: Professor of Law
Denise Réaume: Visiting Professor
Natasha Simonsen: Stipendiary Lecturer in Law, St Annes College
Roger Smith: Associate Professor of Law
Rachel Taylor: Associate Professor of Law
Simon Whittaker: Professor of European Comparative Law

Also working in this field, but not involved in its teaching programme:

Paul Craig: Professor of English Law
John Davies: Retired. Formerly Fellow and Tutor in Law at Brasenose
Simon Douglas: Associate Professor of Law
Olumide Famuyiwa: DPhil Law student
Jodi Gardner: DPhil Law student
Donald Harris: Retired. Formerly Director of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies at Balliol
Arturo Ibanez Leon: DPhil Law student
Angus Johnston: Associate Professor of Law
Martin Matthews: Retired. Formerly CUF Lecturer
Peter North: Retired. Formerly Principal of Jesus
Aleksi Ollikainen: MPhil Law student
Gosia Pearson: Policy Officer, DG Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection of the European Commission
Luke Rostill: DPhil Law student
Marina Sharpe: DPhil Law student
Wing Winky So: DPhil Law student

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