Along with the series of thematic and country-specific debates listed in the navigation panel, the OTJR working paper series hosts the following discrete essays on ongoing transitional justice issues.

Series Papers

 

1. The International Community Fails Rwanda Again 

Tue, 05 May 2009 by Phil Clark and Nicola Palmer

The recent UK High Court decision not to extradite four Rwandan genocide suspects to Rwanda on the grounds that they could not receive a fair trial at home perpetuates misinformed views on legal and political realities in the country.

 

2.Memory Politics in Guatemala: Linking the Battle over Truth with the Pursuit of Justice 

Mon, 20 Feb 2012 by Lavinia Schwedersky

This paper explores how Guatemala fits into the still ongoing peace versus justice and truth versus justice debate. It argues that justice in Guatemala is first and foremost being denied through a denial of the past, illustrating that truth and justice are not mutually exclusive but rather complexly interwoven.

 

3. Northern Uganda: The Effects Of Violence on Identity, and the Consequences for Transitional Justice 

Mon, 20 Feb 2012 by Caroline Argyropulo-Palmer

A re-examination of the violence in Northern Uganda shows the capacity of such conflict to alter identity. Identity formation has been used by those involved in fighting. Recognising shifts in identity poses significant challenges for transitional justice, and refocuses discussions onto issues of compensation and reintegration as forms of justice.

 

4. Striking a Balance between Restorative and Retributive Justice: A New Challenge for International Prosecutors 

Mon, 01 Oct 2012 by Raquel Vazquez Llorente

 

International criminal law has always been inclined to pay more attention to the retributive side of justice to the detriment of the restorative aspect.  This article compares the different models of prosecution, and their approach to the restorative aspect of justice, pursued by the International Criminal Court and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia.