The Law Faculty is housed in the striking St Cross Building, part of Oxford’s 800-year tradition of exciting and challenging architecture. Designed by the influential Leslie Martin, whose work also included the Royal Festival Hall in London, it is uncompromisingly modernist in design and execution.

MODERNITY AND TRADITION

Law has been taught in Oxford for some 850 years. For centuries law meant Roman law, but the common law came into the University in 1758 when Sir William Blackstone became the world’s first Professor of English Law. 

Oxford has been home to many of the key figures of the modern common law such as Anson, Dicey, Pollock, Cheshire, Cross, Morris, and Hart. The study of the common law, including its interaction with modern legislation and regulation, remains central to our pursuits. That core mission has been enriched over the years by strengths in comparative law, the philosophy of law, international law, and European Law.

Our historic connection with the Roman tradition has been reborn in our collaborations with continental European universities. And specialist centres in criminology and socio-legal studies mean that Oxford is now unsurpassed as a place for interdisciplinary work connected with the law and its development.

Our much-admired tutorial system means that students at all levels enjoy direct and intensive engagement with all this expertise and inspiration. But our students also learn a great deal from each other.

We have one of the most diverse student populations in the United Kingdom, and our collegiate system encourages collaborative learning and teamwork, as well as bringing students of many disciplines into daily contact with each other. This is why our graduate law degrees are among the most sought-after in the world.