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MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (full-time)

Overview

This is a nine month full-time programme which equips its graduates with an advanced understanding of crime and criminal justice. The degree comprises core courses in criminological theory and the study of criminal justice, provides training in research design and methodology, and offers students the opportunity to take optional courses in a wide range of subject areas, including policing, sentencing, prisons, the sociology of punishment, restorative justice, crime and the family, human rights, victims, youth justice, risk and security, border criminology and the death penalty.

Students also research and write a dissertation on a subject of their own choosing under the guidance of a supervisor. A stimulating and demanding programme, involving intensive learning in small groups, the MSc is suitable for those with an excellent first degree in sociology, law, politics, psychology, history or another subject relevant to criminology.

Profiles of MSc Criminology Class 2021-22
MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice Student Handbook

Course in brief

Course length
9 months

Components

  • Two Compulsory Courses; Criminology Theories and Criminal Justice, and Research Design and Data Collection
  • Five optional modules selected from a list of 15 or so. See the options here.
  • A dissertation of 12,000 to 15,000 words researched and written independently under supervision
  • Assessment through examination of core course modules, written assessments and assessed essays

Who should consider this course

Students wishing to develop an advanced understanding of crime and criminal justice.

Practical information

Official course overviews, application deadlines and application procedures can be found on the main Oxford University website.

The Centre for Criminology

The MSc is taught by the Centre for Criminology in the Faculty of Law

Course Structure

An induction programme is run in the two weeks before the start of the first term. This introduces students to the modules on offer on the MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice, along with introductions to the computing services and library facilities at Oxford. Students attend introductory lectures on criminological theory, an introduction to the ‘Structure of the English Criminal Justice System’ and an introduction to research methods session. A ‘What to expect’ session will be held by  former MSc students giving further insight into the MSc course and you will be invited to join the welcome drinks reception to meet your cohort along with the tutors and other members of the Centre for Criminology.

Michaelmas Term
Hilary Term
Trinity Term

1. Criminological Theories and

Criminal Justice (compulsory)

2. Research Design and

Data Collection (compulsory)

3. Optional course 1
4. Optional course 2

5. Criminological Theories and Criminal Justice (compulsory)

6. Optional course 3
7. Optional course 4
8. Optional course 5

9. Academic CommunicationSkills (compulsory)

10. Dissertation
 

 

MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Hear from the Director of the Centre and some of our students

The components of the course

The MSc is comprised of three components:

1. The two Compulsory Courses; Criminology Theories and Criminal Justice, and Research Design and Data Collection.

2. Five optional modules selected from a list of 15 or so

3. A dissertation of 12,000 to 15,000 words researched and written independently under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Students are expected to spend at least 40 hours studying each week during term (and they will also need to do some study during vacations). During Michaelmas and Hilary Term students are advised to divide their time between the core course and their other courses in the following way:

  • At least 10 hours preparation a week for the core course;
  • At least 8 hours preparation a week for each option/compulsory course;
  • 4.5 to 6 hours a week in seminars (ninety minutes for each course).

In Trinity term MSc students will work on their dissertation and attend the weekly Academic Communication Skills sessions. 

You will note that this leaves very little time during the week for any paid employment.  We appreciate that some students will have to work a few hours a week in the evenings or at weekends; the Faculty operates a rule that students may not work more than 8 hours per week or a reasonable average over the year.

Options available for the MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice

Scholarships & Bursaries

Other information about the course and the Centre for Criminology