Here are some frequently asked questions about admission to to the BA Law with Law Studies in Europe. Before reading them, please remember that you should always check the Undergraduate Prospectus for authoritative information on current admissions procedures; and the BA Jurisprudence FAQs

If I want to do an undergraduate law degree at Oxford, who do I apply to?

All applications for places on our undergraduate law degrees must be made to a college – not to the Law Faculty. Any offers of a place are made solely by the colleges: the University – and hence the Law Faculty – automatically admits candidates awarded a place by a college. This is because Oxford is a federal University: the University awards degrees, but every undergraduate student must be a member of a college, and each college decides who to admit.

Applications for the four year courses, like those for the three year course, are made to colleges, and all offers of a place are made by colleges. However, the Faculty does have more involvement in applications for the four year courses. Due to the relatively small number of places available on the four year courses, any college’s decisions to offer a place for the four year course require approval by the Faculty. The Faculty’s decisions are made as part of the general admissions process in December of each year and so there is no delay in finding out whether an application to the four year course has been successful or not. In all cases, the college, not the Faculty, will tell you whether your application has been successful.

For further information, see:
How does the college system work?

Who makes the admissions decisions?

Any offers of a place must be made by a college. The main decision is therefore made by the law tutors at the college considering your application. At each college, the law tutors are professional academics who are also lecturers in the Law Faculty. If they admit you, they will also teach you in tutorials (or organise tutorials for you at other colleges in subjects outside their expertise). In making admissions decisions, each college applies exactly the same criteria to its applicants: it is not the case that different colleges look for different types of applicant.

A Faculty panel must approve all offers of a place on any of the four year courses. The Faculty’s decisions are made as part of the general admissions process in December of each year and so there is no delay in finding out whether an application to the four year course has been successful or not. No separate interviews are held by the Faculty committee: the selection is made on the basis of the information provided by the colleges as to the candidates’ application and performance in the admissions process, together with (in the case of applicants for the French, German, Italian and Spanish options) the results of the language tests held during the interview period. In all cases, the college, not the Faculty, will tell you whether your application has been successful.

If you are not successful in this final competition for Law with Law Studies in Europe places your college may nevertheless decide to offer you a place on the regular three year Law course. As a result, you may be asked to indicate at interview whether or not you would be interested in a place on the three year Law course, should your application for the four year course not succeed. Your chances of being accepted for the four year course are unaffected by the answer you give.

List of Law Faculty members showing their college affiliations: most (except the holders of 'statutory chairs') are also college tutors.

Can I apply for more than one of the different four year courses?

If you wish to apply for a four year course, you must choose one of the courses and enter the relevant UCAS code on your UCAS form. For example, if you choose Law with French Law you must put down M191 as the course code on your UCAS form. It will then be clear that your preference is to be offered a place on that particular variant of the four year course. If you are then invited for an interview by a college, you can inform that college (either at interview or before then) that you also wish to be considered for a different version of the four year course. For example, if you inform the college that you also wish to be considered for the Law with Spanish Law course, the college can then ensure you are given an oral language test in Spanish as well as in French. And, if the Faculty panel comes to consider your application, it will consider you first as a candidate for the French Law course, and then as a candidate for the Spanish Law course. Even if you are not offered a place on either of those four year courses, you may still be offered a place on the three year Law course.

Should I study any particular subjects before applying?

At least a C grade in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent) is normally required.

If you are applying for the four year Law with European Law course (to spend the year abroad in the Netherlands), then you do not need to have studied any languages: the courses taken by our students at Leiden are taught in English.

If you are applying for any of the other four year Law with Law Studies in Europe courses then you will need to show you have the necessary language skills. Successful candidates for the French, German, Italian or Spanish versions of the four year course will normally be expected to have (or be predicted to obtain) an A at A-level (or equivalent) in the relevant language. So, where a conditional offer of a place is made to an applicant for one of those courses, an A at A-level (or equivalent) in the relevant language will normally be one of the conditions. As opportunities to study Italian at A-level are not so widespread, the Faculty may exceptionally make offers to candidates for the Italian Law course whose level of Italian is below A-level, but where there is sufficient evidence (typically, from their work on other languages at A-level) that they can be expected, with additional intensive language training during the first two years in Oxford, to be able to bring themselves up to the standard required to study successfully in Italy during the year abroad.

If you are applying for the French, German, Spanish or Italian version of the course and are invited to Oxford for an interview, you should expect to be given a short oral language test as part of the interview process. Such a test is important and you must show the necessary linguistic competence. However, it is important to emphasise that the decision as to whether to offer a place on the four year course is made first and foremost by reference to your potential as a law student, not by your performance in the oral language test.

These points aside, your choice of subjects is your own. Strictly academic subjects matter most. Both arts and sciences are helpful. Studying A-Level or AS Law confers no particular advantage or disadvantage and we are happy to receive applications from those who are studying for such qualifications in law. When Oxford colleges are comparing A-level results and predictions they may attach reduced importance to General Studies.

Check the official table of admissions requirements, which gives more detail of the language requirements for Law with Law Studies in Europe applicants ...

How do I get the application forms?

You need to fill in the online Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) form.  The UCAS form is all that is needed: there is no additional Oxford form.

No separate form is needed for applications to any of the four year courses – your UCAS form is the only thing we need. Please make sure to use the correct UCAS course code on the form – there is a different one for each of the different four year courses: the code for the course involving a year in the Netherlands is M190; for France it is M191; for Germany is M192; for Italy is M193; and for Spain is M194.
Go to the UCAS website