The history of global internet governance can be roughly divided into four phases according to their different leading organizations: IETF’s involvement in internet governance, ICANN’s involvement in internet governance, UN’s involvement in internet governance, post-WSIS and post-WCIT-12 internet governance. Each stage has its different governance model. After WCIT-12, there are two different visions of global internet governance: multistakeholder model and multilateral model. The former is often framed as a bottom-up policy process that encompasses a range of actors from governments, businesses, technical experts, and civil society, and the latter highlights cyber sovereignty, the government’s leading role and the UN’s role in the process of global internet governance. In terms of the two different visions of global internet governance, the participating states are polarised into two camps: western(developed) countries favouring the current multistakeholder model, with the developing countries, including states like China, Russia, and Arab countries, leaning towards multilateral model. Of course, there are some states with ambiguous position for internet government approach (often called "swing states"), such as India, Brazil, South Africa, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea etc.

In general, China’s stance toward global Internet governance is multilateral internet governance model with a little compromise with the multistakeholder internet governance model. Firstly, China’s multilateral internet governance model considers cyberspace sovereignty as the core principle of global internet governance. Secondly, China’s multilateral internet governance model underlines the government’s leading role and the UN’s role in the process of global internet governance. At last, China’s multilateral internet governance model is pragmatic and flexible. Chinese government encourages multiple actors to take part in global internet governance.